Posts Tagged ‘Secrecy’

SEC Didn’t Act After Spotting Wall Street Risks, Documents Show

Greenspan wanted to keep housing bubble concerns from public, new transcripts show

E-mails Show Goldman Execs Boasting as Housing Meltdown Unfolded

Fed Transparency: Dorgan, Grassley Push Amendment To Disclose Spending

The Fed Is Only Authorized to Conduct MONETARY Policy, But It Has Also “Become the Single Largest FISCAL Actor in the U.S. Economy”

Ron Paul on Fox News: Audit the Federal Reserve

Why is Obama’s top man defending the Fed?

Backdoor taxes to hit middle class

Goldman “Sideshow” Hyped To Push Through Obama Banking Reform

Former Nazi bank to rule the global economy

Goldman Sachs CEO on Dem Banking Bill: ‘I’m Generally Supportive’

Levin to Goldman Sachs: ‘You Knew It Was a S–tty Deal!’

Goldman to Congress: We didn’t mislead clients

Economists: The stimulus didn’t help

Lee supports audit of Federal Reserve

Wow! The SEC Formally Charges Goldman Sachs With Fraud

Goldman Sachs Admits To Engaging In “Improper Behavior” During The Housing Crash – But They Aren’t About To Give The Money Back

How Goldman Sachs Made Tens Of Billions Of Dollars From The Economic Collapse Of America In Four Easy Steps

Big Banks Are Back as JPMorgan, Citigroup Turn Corner on Crisis

Obama Debt Czar Says Tax Hikes “On The Table”

US prepares to push for global capital rules

For nations living the good life, the party’s over, IMF says

America’s Crumbling Infrastructure

Major Banks Said to Cover Up Debt Levels

Alan Grayson Discloses That Dodd Bill Covertly Eliminates Already Passed Legislation Requiring Full Fed Audit

IMF’s Global Taxes Can Only Be Enforced Through Global Government

IMF “FAT Tax” To “Reign In Banks” Will Increase Costs For Consumers

WH: Obama Not Going to Return $1M in Goldman Cash

Sherman: Dodd Bill Contains Unlimited Bailout Authority

Obama on ‘Global Rebalancing’: American Consumers & Government Aren’t Coming Back Any Time Soon

London Observer: Now we know the truth. The financial meltdown wasn’t a mistake – it was a con

Casino Carnival Barker Jim Cramer Defends Goldman Sachs

Goldman Sachs set to pay £3.5bn in bonuses

Obama Banking Regulation Bill Does Not Go After Big Banks

Bankers Prepare To Assault Americans With VAT, Transaction Taxes

Other Major Banks Did Deals Similar to Goldman’s

Investor Who Made Billions Not Targeted in Suit

Banksters Rally Round Fed To Keep Bailout Trillions Secret

Bernanke: We Must Raise Taxes and Cut Services • Sane People: No, We Need to Stop Endless Bail Outs, Imperial Adventures and Fraudulent Schemes

Federal Reserve Power Grab Bill Moves to Senate

Federal Reserve Must Disclose Bank Bailout Records

Lehman Brothers’ chiefs concealed losses with accounting ‘gimmick’ days before $700billion collapse

IMF Head Calls For Huge Global Warming Slush Fund

Barney Frank Demands Bernanke Probe Fed Involvement In Watergate Scandal And Iraq Arms Sales Following Ron Paul Questioning

EU Federal Economic Government Proposal Mirrors Nazi Plan For Fourth Reich

Gordon Brown to push for ‘Tobin tax’ after Wall Street crackdown

Report from South Florida about officers’ secret “ticket talk” with judges.

An Associated Press review of Freedom of Information Act reports filed by 17 major government agencies has revealed that, despite Barack Obama’s promise to make government more transparent, more information is now being withheld from the public.

The review finds that during Obama’s first year in office, a FOIA provision that allows the government to conceal details of its internal decision-making was invoked more frequently than during the outgoing year of the Bush administration.

The provision to refuse the release of internal documents was cited some 70,779 times during the financial year of 2009, compared with just 47,395 times in 2008.

MORE

Documents recently obtained by the ACLU show that the government warned the 9/11 Commission against getting to the bottom of the September 11 terror attacks in a letter signed by Attorney General John Ashcroft, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and CIA Director George J. Tenet.

In a letter dated January 6, 2004, the Commission was refused permission to question terrorist detainees, with inquiry leaders Hamilton and Kean being told there was “A line that the Commission should not cross,” in the course of its investigation.

A PDF of the letter (page 26) can be read here.

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London Telegraph:

The former CIA chief, Porter Goss, approved a 2005 decision to destroy 92 tapes showing US agents waterboarding two terrorism suspects, according to newly released internal emails.

FBI investigators are still examining who knew what about the destruction of the videos, which showed officers using the simulated drowning technique that is widely considered to be torture, on Abu Zubaydah and another terrorism suspect.

The emails were released by the Justice Department under a Freedom of Information Act request by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Secrecy News:

The Obama Administration presented “several misstatements of law and fact” in its March 15 letter opposing legislation to enhance the role of the Government Accountability Office in intelligence oversight, the head of the GAO said in a letter to congressional intelligence committees yesterday.

The GAO letter (pdf) said that neither the Senate nor the House version of the FY2010 intelligence authorization act would fundamentally alter the status quo with respect to the GAO, as the White House letter (pdf) had indicated, but would simply bolster the oversight authority that the GAO already has, enabling it to overcome the obstacles placed in its way by the executive branch.

“The proposed legislative provisions in essence reaffirm GAO’s existing authority in order to address the lack of cooperation GAO has received from certain elements of the IC [intelligence community] in carrying out work at the specific request of the intelligence committees, and other committees of jurisdiction as defined by the rules of the Senate and House,” wrote Acting Comptroller General Gene L. Dodaro in a March 18 letter obtained by Secrecy News.

“GAO acknowledges and does not seek to displace the special relationship between the congressional intelligence committees and the IC,” he wrote.

“However, GAO does not agree with the Administration’s view, originating in a 1988 opinion of the Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Counsel, that the creation of the congressional intelligence oversight structure implicitly exempted reviews of intelligence activities from the scope of GAO’s existing audit authority.”

The executive branch’s interpretation of the law “has resulted in GAO frequently being unable to obtain the access or cooperation necessary to provide useful information to Congress on matters involving the IC,” Mr. Dodaro wrote.

“Even where the matters under evaluation are well outside the scope of traditional intelligence activities… GAO has encountered resistance.”

“While intelligence oversight poses unique challenges, GAO can play an important role in such oversight, and that role is well within our authority and capability,” he wrote.

GAO has no independent stake in intelligence oversight and has plenty of other work to do anyway.  The question is whether Congress wants to take advantage of the investigative and analytical resources that GAO has to offer in order to improve intelligence oversight.  If it does, then the pending legislation would help to clear away the barriers imposed by the executive branch.

“Should either the Senate or House version of the GAO provision at issue become law,” Mr. Dodaro wrote, “I believe that the reaffirmation of GAO’s authorities would help better position GAO to do the type of work that has been requested of us in the past and to respond to the interests of Congress in this realm in the future.”

Mother Jones:

WikiLeaks has revealed the secrets of the Pentagon, Scientology, and Sarah Palin—and the explosive video of a US attack on civilians and journalists in Iraq. Meet the shadowy figure behind the whistleblower site.

Julian Assange’s response to this article is here. Read follow-up posts on WikiLeaks’ media blitz and the MoJo-WikiLeaks feud.

The clock struck 3 a.m. Julian Assange slept soundly inside a guarded private compound in Nairobi, Kenya. Suddenly, six men with guns emerged from the darkness. A day earlier, they had disabled the alarm system on the electric fence and buried weapons by the pool. Catching a guard by surprise, they commanded him to hit the ground. He obliged, momentarily, then jumped up and began shouting. As the rest of the compound’s security team rushed outside, the intruders fled into the night.

Assange, a thirty-something Australian with a shock of snow-white hair, is sure the armed men were after him. “There was not anyone else worth visiting in the compound,” he says, speaking on the phone from an undisclosed location in Africa.

The self-centeredness and shadowy details of Assange’s tale—and his insistence that he must be taken at his word—are typical. They’re part of his persona as the elusive yet single-minded public face of WikiLeaks, the website that dubs itself the “uncensorable Wikipedia for untraceable mass document leaking and analysis.” Designed as a digital drop box, the site is a place where anyone can anonymously post sensitive or secret information to be disseminated and downloaded around the globe. Earlier this week, it posted its most explosive leak yet, a video shot by an American attack helicopter in July 2007 as it opened fire upon a group of a men on a Baghdad street, killing 12, including two unarmed Reuters employees. (Two children were also seriously wounded in a subsequent attack.) WikiLeaks said it had obtained the classified footage from whistleblowers inside the US military.

Since its launch in December, 2006, WikiLeaks has posted more than 1.2 million documents totaling more than 10 million pages. It has published the operating manuals from the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, NATO’s secret plan for the Afghan war, and inventories of US military materiel in Iraq and Afghanistan. In September 2007, a few weeks before Assange’s alleged close call in Nairobi, it posted a document exposing corruption in the highest levels of the Kenyan government. Assange claims that the site receives as many as 10,000 new documents daily.

WikiLeaks’ commitment to what might be called extreme transparency also means that it won’t turn away documents that have questionable news value or are just plain dishy. It’s posted Sarah Palin’s hacked emails and Wesley Snipes’ tax returns, as well as fraternity initiation manuals and a trove of secret Scientology manuals. According to WikiLeaks’ credo, to refuse a leak is tantamount to helping the bad guys. “We never censor,” Assange declares.

Powerful forces have come after the site, but without much luck. In 2008, after WikiLeaks posted documents alleging money laundering at the Swiss bank Julius Baer, the firm unsuccessfully tried to shut down its California servers. When the site posted a secret list of websites blacklisted by the German government, including several child pornography sites, the student who ran the German WikiLeaks site was arrested for disseminating kiddie porn. Even the hyper-litigious Church of Scientology has failed to get its materials removed from the site.

Such unsurprising reactions to WikiLeaks’ brazenness only seem to further energize Assange’s conviction that it’s always wrong to try to stop a leak. WikiLeaks isn’t shy about antagonizing its enemies. Its reply to the German raid sounded like the opening shot of an Internet flame war: “Go after our source and we will go after you.” In response to the Church of Scientology’s “attempted suppression,” it has posted even more church documents.

WikiLeaks can get away with this because its primary server is in Sweden (Assange says it’s the same one used by the giant download site The Pirate Bay), where divulging an anonymous source, whether one’s own or someone else’s, is illegal. Several mirror sites across the globe provide backup in case one goes down. (Much of the WikiLeaks website is currently inaccessible due to a fundraising drive.)

Though the site appears secure for now, its foes have not given up on finding its weaknesses. In March, WikiLeaks published an internal report (PDF) written by an analyst at the Army Counterintelligence Center titled “WikiLeaks.org—An Online Reference to Foreign Intelligence Services, Insurgents, or Terrorist Groups?” The analyst stated that sensitive information posted by WikiLeaks could endanger American soldiers and that the site could be used “to post fabricated information; to post misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda.” He concluded that identifying and prosecuting the insiders who pass information on to WikiLeaks “would damage and potentially destroy this center of gravity and deter others from taking similar actions.”

WikiLeaks said the report was proof that “U.S. Intelligence planned to destroy” the site. Soon afterwards, Assange asserted that he’d been tailed by two State Department employees on a flight out of Iceland, where he had been lobbying for a new press freedom law. He tweeted that “WikiLeaks is currently under an aggressive US and Icelandic surveillance operation.”

Amid this swirl of wanted and unwanted attention, Assange (pronounced A-sanj) lives like a man on the lam. He won’t reveal his age—”Why make it easy for the bastards?” He prefers talking on the phone instead of meeting in person, and seems to never use the same number twice. His voice is often hushed, and gaps fill the conversation, as if he’s constantly checking over his shoulder. Like him, the organization behind his next-generation whistleblowing machine can also be maddeningly opaque. It’s been accused of being conspiratorial, reckless, and even duplicitous in its pursuit of exposing the powerful. “It’s a good thing that there’s a channel for getting information out that’s reliable and can’t be compromised,” says Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig. But, he adds, “There’s a difference between what you can legally do, what you can technically do, and what you ought to do.”