Posts Tagged ‘Neocons’

Just found this. I imagine some GOP apologist types have some sort of explaination for this. It’ll probably be something along the lines of a “Freudian Slip” rationalization. It’s too bad the 2 different times GWB said it there’s no chance it was a FS, and sure enough thats what we got. Regardless of who is ‘elected’, they’re inheriting a de facto dictatorial power throne.

Tonight I noticed thru the handy WordPress panel that Huffington Post linked to the site in reference to my old James Woolsey post:

*Neocon PNAC Member / CIA Director James Woolsey thumbed Iraq just 2 hours after 9/11

After seeing this I considered posting a link to the Archive.org source of the cited NBC clip. When I looked at the site I noticed a lack of link for the time-slot in question. I then went and found the (rather rare) original raw news-feed clip, that I have, where I found the bit. I made an error on the time, as I’ll explain shortly, below. But it turns out he was actually on 2 hours early making the same link anyways.

The article is authored by Muhammad Sahimi, and is about McCain’s foreign policy advisors. It’s actually an important piece, the sort I’d consider reposting had I seen it and not be linking here now.

He cited my blog site here in reference to the James Woolsey Youtube clip I uploaded a long time ago and did that writeup. I found that clip from the Archive.org 9/11 news archive. In February 2007 news happened, that implicated a backdoor to download raw quality MPG clips directly from the Archive’s archiving system. The Archive 9/11 stuff was rather unknown and I’m not even sure totally available, and these 1GB source clips weren’t meant for public consumption. So when the news broke during that whole ‘BBC reported WTC7 collapse before it did’ fiasco, some of us out there looked past the story and sought out where to find the clips.

So for less than 24 hours after the story went viral there was a limited window to grab whatever you could. From my take I found that portion inside there, later on. The filenames were quite different than how they’re now named at Archive. Those who took part in this ‘preservation of history’ effort ended up with rather random clips. Only a handful of complete sets of the ‘raw’ (not quite, but close) exist.

Here is the filename of the clip this post is all about:
V08554-10 nbc200109122209-2251.mpg

So that’s NBC, 2001, 09 (September), 12 (date), 2209-2251 (military time).

Somehow I slipped and mixed up the military time and confused that with it being 2:26 on 9/11, when it was actually 10:26 on 9/12. As I’ll point out below, Woolsey still made the link the same night only about 2 hours earlier.

On my bad, I’m not at all enjoying catching myself with such a ‘large’ error. In fact I wish someone would have spotted this mistake for me long ago. I’m sure I looked at the time more than once, but whatever happened I made the error, posted it, and never looked back. The ‘rarity’ of the situation helped it get overlooked by the sorts who would normally correct fouls, I suppose.

As was already present on Wikipedia, when I found my Woolsey clip, Woolsey did make the link to Iraq at 10:54 on the morning of 9/12. But now there is one clip posted on Youtube that might actually show Woolsey after midnight of 9/11 making the claim. This clip is stated to be “after midnight on 9/11″. Note that this timeslot isn’t available at Archive.org. But I do think it was from 9/12, as if you look at the ABC clip from 9/13 the anchors are different than the clip just before midnight on 9/11. [Another thing I find interesting is thatPeter Jennings mentioned that it was the second time ABC had him on that day (meaning 9/11).]

So this doesn’t hurt Sahimi’s article, in my view. Furthermore, Woolsey was one of the key Neocon drum beating war-hawks who was regularly on the nightly news of various networks screaming for war with Iraq in the early months directly after 9/11, as documented in Bill Moyer’s most excellent PBS presentation “Buying The War“.

Woolsey was a key instrument in propadandizing the population long before the Bush administration began parroting the ‘kill Iraq’ framework Woosley, Pearle and Kristol mantra. So it could be said that Woolsey and the other 2 should be charged before Bush & Cheney, or at least at the same Nuremberg show trial extravaganza.

I have many of the roughly 418 42-minute 1GB clips, but I haven’t played the Archive clips I don’t possess. Besides, it appears the clip now in question isn’t available, although I haven’t ever bothered comparing what is posted as quality-chopped streams at Archive with the master list of the original file set, that I do have. But since that time I have noticed many different news-feed uploads on the torrent networks, from time to time. I might even have that piece, although I have so much data I don’t have time ot look for it now. Note the Archive set is of what was broadcasted in DC.

Paul Craig Roberts
Counterpunch
October 28, 2008

“We’re an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you’re  studying that reality — judiciously, as you will — we’ll act again, creating other new  realities, which you can study too, and that’s how things will sort out. We’re history’s  actors . . . and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do.”

–Bush White House aide explaining the New Reality

The New American Century lasted a decade.  Financial crisis and defeated objectives in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Georgia brought the neoconservative project for American world hegemony crashing to a close in the autumn of 2008.

The neocons used September 11, 2001, as a “new Pearl Harbor” to give power precedence over law domestically and internationally.  The executive branch no longer had to obey federal statutes, such as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act or honor international treaties, such as the Geneva Conventions.  An asserted “terrorist threat” to national security became the cloak which hid US imperial interests as the Bush Regime set about dismantling US civil liberties and the existing order of international law constructed by previous governments during the post-war era.

Perhaps the neoconservative project for world hegemony would have lasted a bit longer had the neocons possessed intellectual competence.

On the war front, the incompetent neocons predicted that the Iraq war would be a six-week cakewalk, whose $70 billion cost would be paid out of Iraqi oil revenues.  President Bush fired White House economist Larry Lindsey for estimating that the war would cost $200 billion.   The current estimate by experts is that the Iraq war has cost American taxpayers between two and three trillion dollars. And the six-week war is now the six-year war.

On the economic front, the incompetent neocons overlooked the fact that a country that relocates its industry and best jobs abroad in order to maximize short-run profits becomes progressively economically weaker.  Propagandistic talk about a “New Economy” built around financial dominance covered up the fact that the US was the world’s greatest debtor country, dependent on foreigners to finance the daily operation of its government, the home mortgages of its citizens, and its military operations abroad.

In Iraq the neocons gave up their hegemonic military pretensions when they put 80,000 Sunni insurgents on the US Army’s payroll in order to scale down the fighting and reduce US casualties.

In Afghanistan the neocons gave up more military pretensions when they had to rely on NATO troops to fight the Taliban.

US military pretensions came to an end in Georgia when the Bush Regime sent Georgian troops to ethnically cleanse South Ossetia of Russian residents in order to end the secessionist movement in the province, thereby clearing the path for Georgia’s NATO membership. It took Russian soldiers only a few hours to destroy the US and Israeli trained and equipped Georgian Army.

The ongoing financial crisis has put an end to the pretensions of American financial hegemony and free-market illusions that deregulation and offshoring had brought prosperity to America.

In a long article, “The End of Arrogance,” on September 30, the German news magazine Der Spiegel observed:

This is no longer the muscular and arrogant United States the world knows, the  superpower that sets the rules for everyone else and that considers its  way of  thinking and doing business to be the only road to success.

Also on display is the end of arrogance. The Americans are now paying the price for  their pride.

Gone are the days when the US could go into debt with abandon, without considering  who would end up footing the bill. And gone are the days when it could impose its  economic rules of engagement on the rest of the world, rules that emphasized  profit above all else — without ever considering that such returns cannot be  achieved by doing business in a respectable way.

A new chapter in economic history has begun, one in which the United States will no longer play its former dominant role. A process of redistributing money and power  around the world — away from America and toward the resource-rich countries and  rising industrialized nations in Asia — has been underway for years. The financial  crisis will only accelerate the process.

Looking at his defeated adversary, George W. Bush, brought down by military and economic failure, Iranian President Ahmadinejad observed:  “The American empire in the world is reaching the end of its road, and its next rulers must limit their interference to their own borders.”

Truer words were never spoken.

Republican Sen. John McCain served on the advisory board to the U.S. chapter of an international group linked to ultra-right-wing death squads in Central America in the 1980s.

The U.S. Council for World Freedom also aided rebels trying to overthrow the leftist government of Nicaragua. That landed the group in the middle of the Iran-Contra affair and in legal trouble with the Internal Revenue Service, which revoked the charitable organization’s tax exemption.

The council created by retired Army Maj. Gen. John Singlaub was the U.S. chapter of the World Anti-Communist League, an international organization linked to former Nazi collaborators and ultra-right-wing death squads in Central America. After setting up the U.S. council, Singlaub served as the international league’s chairman.

McCain’s tie to Singlaub’s council is undergoing renewed scrutiny after his presidential campaign criticized Barack Obama for his link to William Ayers, a former radical who engaged in violent acts 40 years ago. Over the weekend, Democratic operative Paul Begala said on ABC’s “This Week” that this “guilt by association” tactic could backfire on the McCain campaign by renewing discussion of McCain’s service on the board of the U.S. Council for World Freedom, “an ultraconservative right-wing group.”

In two interviews with The Associated Press in August and September, Singlaub said McCain became associated with the organization in the early 1980s as McCain launched his political career. McCain was elected to the House in 1982.

Singlaub said McCain was a supporter but not an active member.

“McCain was a new guy on the block learning the ropes,” Singlaub said. “I think I met him in the Washington area when he was just a new congressman. We had McCain on the board to make him feel like he wasn’t left out. It looks good to have names on a letterhead who are well-known and appreciated.

“I don’t recall talking to McCain at all on the work of the group,” Singlaub said.

McCain has said he resigned from the council in 1984 and asked in 1986 to have his name removed from the group’s letterhead.

“I didn’t know whether (the group’s activity) was legal or illegal, but I didn’t think I wanted to be associated with them,” McCain said in a 1986 newspaper interview.

Singlaub does not recall any McCain resignation in 1984 or May 1986. Nor does Joyce Downey, who oversaw the group’s day-to-day activities.

“That’s a surprise to me,” Singlaub said. “This is the first time I’ve ever heard that. There may have been someone in his office communicating with our office.”

“I don’t ever remember hearing about his resigning, but I really wasn’t worried about that part of our activities, a housekeeping thing,” said Singlaub. “If he didn’t want to be on the board that’s OK. It wasn’t as if he had been active participant and we were going to miss his help. He had no active interest. He certainly supported us.”

A news article and two documents tie McCain to the council in 1985, a year after he says he resigned. The group’s Internal Revenue Service filing in 1985, covering the previous year, lists McCain as a member of the council’s advisory board. In October 1985, a States News Service report placed McCain, Rep. Tom Loeffler, R-Texas, and an Arizona congressman at a Washington awards ceremony staged by the council.

On Tuesday, the McCain campaign addressed the resignation by saying the candidate disassociated himself from “one Arizona-based group when questions were raised about its activities.”

Taking an opportunity to attack the Obama-Biden ticket, the McCain campaign added that as a House member and later as a senator, McCain fought against communist influence in Central America while Sen. Joe Biden tried to cut off money for anti-communist forces in El Salvador and Nicaragua.

The renewed attention over McCain’s association with Singlaub’s group comes as his campaign steps up criticism of Obama’s dealings with Ayers, now a college professor who co-founded the Weather Underground in the 1960s and years later worked with Obama on the board of an education reform group in Chicago. Ayers held a meet-the-candidate event at his home when Obama first ran for public office in the mid-1990s.

In McCain’s case, he was a House member and a board member of Singlaub’s council when, as a new congressman, he voted for military assistance to the Nicaraguan Contras, a CIA-organized guerrilla force. In 1984, Congress cut off military assistance to the rebels.

Months before the cutoff, top Reagan administration officials ramped up a secret White House-directed supply network run by national security advisers Robert McFarlane and John Poindexter. The operation’s day-to-day activities were handled by National Security Council aide Oliver North, who relied on retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard Secord to carry out the operation. The goal was to keep the Contras operating until Congress could be persuaded to resume CIA funding.

Singlaub’s private group became the public front for the secret White House activity.

“It was noted that they were trying to act as suppliers. It was pretty good cover for us,” Secord, the field operations chief for the secret effort, said Tuesday in an interview.

The White House-directed network’s covert arms shipments, financed in part by the Reagan administration’s secret arms sales to Iran, exploded into the Iran-Contra affair in November 1986. The scandal proved to be the undoing of Singlaub’s council.

In 1987, the IRS withdrew tax-exempt status from Singlaub’s group because of its activities on behalf of the Contras.

Peter Kornbluh, co-author of “The Iran-Contra Scandal: A Declassified History,” said the Council on World Freedom was crucial to diverting public attention from the Reagan White House’s fundraising for the Contras.

Singlaub and the council publicly urged private support for the Contras, providing what Singlaub later called “a lightning rod” to explain how the rebels sustained themselves despite Congress’ cutoff.

In October 1986, the secrecy of North’s network unraveled after one of its planes was shot down over Nicaragua. One American crewman, Eugene Hasenfus, was captured by the Nicaraguan government. At first, Reagan administration officials lied by saying that the plane had no connection to the U.S. government and was part of Singlaub’s operation.

“I resented it that reporters thought it was my plane. I don’t run a sloppy operation,” Singlaub told The AP.

In an interview last month, Downey, the full-time employee of Singlaub’s council, said she has a clear memory of McCain resigning in 1986, but not earlier.

“It was during the time when the U.S. Council had been wrongly accused of being owners of the Hasenfus plane downed in Nicaragua,” said Downey. “A couple of days after that, I was in Washington and called home to get messages from my mother. I returned that call and a staff person wanted to ask for the resignation of Congressman McCain.”

When Hasenfus was shot down, McCain was in the final month of his first campaign for the Senate seat he still holds.

McCain’s office responded quickly. McCain said he had resigned from the council in 1984. Further, McCain said that in May 1986 he asked the group to remove his name from the letterhead. McCain’s office produced two letters from 1984 and 1986 to back his account.

The dates on the resignation letters in 1984 and May 1986 coincided with McCain election campaigns and increasingly critical public scrutiny of the World Anti-Communist League, the umbrella group Singlaub chaired.

In 1983 and 1984 for example, columnist Jack Anderson linked the league’s Latin American affiliate to death squad political assassinations.

The Latin American affiliate was kicked out of the league. At the time, Singlaub told the columnist the Latin American affiliate had “knowingly promoted pro-Nazi groups” and was “virulently anti-Semitic.”

“That was putting it mildly,” Anderson wrote in a Sept. 11, 1984, column on alleged death squad murders, an article that appeared two months before the U.S. election day.

Two weeks after Anderson’s column, a letter from McCain addressed to Singlaub asks that the congressman’s name be taken off the board because he didn’t have time for the council.

Singlaub told AP that “certainly by 1984,” he had purged the World Anti-Communist League of extremists. Singlaub complains that American news media wrote that the league hadn’t gotten rid of extremist elements and tried to tarnish the league’s credibility, “making something evil out of fighting communism.”

MSNBC:

U.S. Army Major General John Singlaub

Stephen Jaffe / AFP -Getty Images file
Retired U.S. Army Major General John Singlaub(front), speaks to reporters as then-Secretary of Defense William Cohen looks on in July 21, 1998. Singlaub founded the controversial U.S. Council for World Freedom, which was dedicated to stamping out communism around the globe. Singlaub says McCain became associated with the organization in the early 1980s.

WASHINGTON – GOP presidential nominee John McCain has past connections to a private group that supplied aid to guerrillas seeking to overthrow the leftist government of Nicaragua in the Iran-Contra affair.

McCain’s ties are facing renewed scrutiny after his campaign criticized Barack Obama for his link to a former radical who engaged in violent acts 40 years ago.

The U.S. Council for World Freedom was part of an international organization linked to former Nazi collaborators and ultra-right-wing death squads in Central America. The group was dedicated to stamping out communism around the globe.

The council’s founder, retired Army Maj. Gen. John Singlaub, said McCain became associated with the organization in the early 1980s as McCain was launching his political career in Arizona. Singlaub said McCain was a supporter but not an active member in the group.

‘New guy on the block’
“McCain was a new guy on the block learning the ropes,” Singlaub told The Associated Press in an interview. “I think I met him in the Washington area when he was just a new congressman. We had McCain on the board to make him feel like he wasn’t left out. It looks good to have names on a letterhead who are well-known and appreciated.

“I don’t recall talking to McCain at all on the work of the group,” Singlaub said.

The renewed attention over McCain’s association with Singlaub’s group comes as McCain’s campaign steps up criticism of Obama’s dealings with William Ayers, a college professor who co-founded the Weather Underground and years later worked on education reform in Chicago alongside Obama. Ayers held a meet-the-candidate event at his home when Obama first ran for public office in the mid-1990s.

Obama was roughly 8 years old when Ayers, now at the University of Illinois at Chicago, was working with the Weather Underground, which took responsibility for bombings that included nonfatal blasts at the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol. McCain’s vice presidential nominee, Sarah Palin, has said that Obama “pals around with terrorists.”

In McCain’s case, Singlaub knew McCain’s father, a Navy admiral who had sought Singlaub’s counsel when McCain, a Navy pilot, became a prisoner of war and spent 5 1/2 years in North Vietnamese hands.

“John’s father asked me for advice about what he ought to do now that his son had been shot down and captured,” Singlaub recalled in one of two recent interviews. “I said, ‘As long as you don’t give any impression that you care more about him than you care about any of the other prisoners, he won’t be treated any differently.’”

Covert arms shipments
Covert arms shipments to the rebels called Contras, financed in part by secret arms sales to Iran, became known as the Iran-Contra affair. They proved to be the undoing of Singlaub’s council.

In 1987, the Internal Revenue Service withdrew the tax-exempt status of Singlaub’s group because of its activities on behalf of the Contras.

Elected to the House in 1982 and at a time when he was on the board of Singlaub’s council, McCain was among Republicans on Capitol Hill expressing support for the Contras, a CIA-organized guerrilla force in Central America. In 1984, Congress cut off CIA funds for the Contras.

Months before the cutoff, top Reagan administration officials ramped up a secret White House-directed supply network and put National Security Council aide Oliver North in charge of running it. The goal was to keep the Contras operational until Congress could be persuaded to resume CIA funding.

Singlaub’s private group became the public cover for the White House operation.

Secretly, Singlaub worked with North in an effort to raise millions of dollars from foreign governments.

McCain resignation?
McCain has said previously he resigned from the council in 1984 and asked in 1986 to have his name removed from the group’s letterhead.

“I didn’t know whether (the group’s activity) was legal or illegal, but I didn’t think I wanted to be associated with them,” McCain said in a newspaper interview in 1986.

Singlaub does not recall any McCain resignation in 1984 or May 1986. Nor does Joyce Downey, who oversaw the group’s day-to-day activities.

“That’s a surprise to me,” Singlaub said. “This is the first time I’ve ever heard that. There may have been someone in his office communicating with our office.”

“I don’t ever remember hearing about his resigning, but I really wasn’t worried about that part of our activities, a housekeeping thing,” said Singlaub. “If he didn’t want to be on the board that’s OK. It wasn’t as if he had been active participant and we were going to miss his help. He had no active interest. He certainly supported us.”