Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

“The only way to prevent global ecological collapse and thus ensure the survival of humanity is to rid the world of Industrial Civilization,” writes Farnish, adding that “people will die in huge numbers when civilization collapses”.

“Keith Farnish has it right: time has practically run out, and the ’system’ is the problem,” wrote Dr. James Hansen on the Amazon website. “Governments are under the thumb of fossil fuel special interests – they will not look after our and the planet’s well-being until we force them to do so, and that is going to require enormous effort.

FULL STORY

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Obama Admin: “Produce a global regime” to combat climate change

Take a look at this image of the placement of a weather station near an airport runway: LINK

Guide to the Climate Scandals

Coleman’s Corner (great San Diego local news reports)

Government Report Says Global Warming May Cause Cancer, Mental Illness

Climate-Change Bill Avoids ‘Cap-and-Trade’ Tag in U.S. Senate

UN IPCC Scientist: ‘The currently promoted greenhouse theory is dead and its consequences have to be removed at once’

“Climate Change” Scamsters to go Global

Not a joke: Gore’s “Inconvenient Youth

In U.S., Many Environmental Issues at 20-Year-Low Concern

NPR and CNN worry that Global Warming may have caused Iceland’s Volcano!!!

Climate sceptic wins landmark data victory ‘for price of a stamp’

Sting’s Hypocritical “Green Tea Party” Lecture

CNN Pushes Brutal One Child Policy As Part Of “Green” Love Life

Wikipedia and Environment Canada caught with temperature data errors.

NASA “Facts” document doubts climate model certainty

‘Population Bomb’ author Paul Ehrlich suggested adding a forced sterilization agent to ’staple food’ and ‘water supply’

A House bill aiming to make research and data open to the public

UN Plans for “Green World Order”

Climategate Investigation Whitewash: Third Panel Member Exposed As Warmist

‘Hockey stick’ graph was exaggerated – McIntyre gets props

IPCC AR4 also gets a failing grade on 21 chapters

The new math – IPCC version

British lawyer urges UN to accept ‘ecocide’ as international crime on par with genocide

Sediments Show Pattern in Earth’s Long-Term Climate Record

I thought of killing myself, says climate scandal professor Phil Jones

More “hiding the decline”

IPCC – How not to compare temperatures

VIDEO: Congressman believes islands float, and tip over with too many people

NASA Data Worse Than Climate-Gate Data, GISS Admits

Atlantic conveyor belt – still going strong and will be the day after tomorrow

The Guardian sees the light on wind driven Arctic ice loss

Flowers Losing Scent Due to Climate Change

Find the weather station in this photo

North and Booker on Amazongate: A $60 Billion cash cow

Weather balloon data backs up missing decline found in old magazine

Medieval Warm Period seen in western USA tree ring fire scars

Sat tracking of ultraviolet light shows increase since 1979

Another Look at Climate Sensitivity (No Atmosphere = only 8°C cooler)

Rewriting the decline

UK ads banned for overstating climate change

Another WWF assisted IPCC claim debunked: Amazon more drought resistant than claimed

Paleo-clamatology

Spencer: Global Urban Heat Island Effect Study – An Update

When the IPCC ‘disappeared’ the Medieval Warm Period

Former Apartheid Spy Appointed to Head UN Climate Change Effort

Accuracy of climate station electronic sensors – not the best

IPCC AR4 Commenter: “I do not understand why this trend is insignificant – it is more than three times the quoted error estimates”

Former VP Gore to Receive Honorary Doctorate from UT Knoxville

2001-2010 was the Snowiest Decade on Record

Head of ‘Climategate’ research unit admits he hid data – because it was ‘standard practice’

U.S. Data Since 1895 Fail To Show Warming Trend

The Times: “University ‘tried to mislead MPs on climate change e-mails’”

Institute of Physics on Climategate

A new paper comparing NCDC rural and urban US surface temperature data

WMO: “. . . we cannot at this time conclusively identify anthropogenic signals in past tropical cyclone data.”

Climategate Minority Report

2009 paper confirming IPCC sea level conclusions withdrawn, mistakes cited

U.N. Climate Chief Resigns

IPCC gate Du Jour – Antarctic Sea Ice Increase Underestimated by 50%

IPCC Gate Du Jour – now IPCC hurricane data questioned

Scripps: Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse Possibly Triggered by Ocean Waves

CRU’s Jones: Climate data ‘not well organised’ and MWP debate ‘not settled’

New Paper in Science: Sea level 81,000 years ago was 1 meter higher while CO2 was lower

Nature suggests IPCC get an overhaul or scrapped

The Green Police: window swat team edition

NOAA’s new website climate.gov – a first day sin of omission

IPCC Gate Du Jour: Aussie Droughtgate

Munging Madagascar

New study using satellite data: Alaskan glacier melt overestimated

The Times: Top British scientist says IPCC is losing credibility

Israeli study shows variable sea level in past 2500 years

Forests in the Eastern United States are growing faster than they have in the past 225 years

LBNL on Himalayas: “greenhouse gases alone are not nearly enough to be responsible for the snow melt”

Climategate intensifies: Jones and Wang apparently hid Chinese station data issues

Spencer: Natural variability unexplained in IPCC models

Record cold in Florida kills reef coral

UHI is alive and well

IPCC Gate Du Jour: UN climate change panel based claims on student dissertation and magazine article

New paper in Nature on CO2 amplification: “it’s less than we thought”

Floating Islands

Amazon flavor “gate du jour” leaves a bad taste

Pew Poll: global warming dead last, down from last year

Loophole in UK FOIA law will apparently allow CRU to avoid prosecution

For the IPCC AR4, “weather events are climate” – looks like another retraction is needed

“The Science is Scuttled” – NASA climate page, suckered by IPCC, deletes their own ‘moved up’ glacier melting date reference

scientist admits IPCC used fake data to pressure policy makers

Save the planet from GHG’s – use astroturf?

Brookhaven National Laboratory: Why Hasn’t Earth Warmed as Much as Expected?

The IPCC: Hiding the Decline in the Future Global Population at Risk of Water Shortage

Newly released FOIA’d emails from Hansen and GISS staffers show disagreement over 1998-1934 U.S. temperature ranking

Carbon trading fraud in Belgium – “up to 90% of the whole market volume was caused by fraudulent activities”

Not as bad as they thought: Coral can recover from climate change damage

More carbon is sequestered by echinoderms than previously thought.

Winter kills: Excess Deaths in the Winter Months

Swiss ETH: Glaciers melted in the 1940′s faster than today

NASA -vs- NASA: which temperature anomaly map to believe?

No statistically significant warming since 1995: a quick mathematical proof

Study shows CFCs, cosmic rays major culprits for global warming

Russian IEA claims CRU tampered with climate data – cherrypicked warmest stations

Soot having a big impact on Himalyan temperature – as much or more than GHG’s

What’s going on? CRU takes down Briffa Tree Ring Data and more

Would You Like Your Temperature Data Homogenized, or Pasteurized?

GISS “raw” station data – before and after

Counting CRU “tricks”

For years I’ve been arguing that Global Warming is the Neoliberal version of the Neocon’s “War on Terror” scheme being used to usher in a planetary Strong AI global computer network along side the ‘NWO’. They’re really it out there in this context now…

(See also: *DARPA & IBM building a “global brain” “cognitive computer” for “monitoring people” and the “world”.)

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http://www.planetaryskin.org/

What is the Planetary Skin R&D Program ?

The Challenge

“Flying Blind” in a complex and volatile World

The policies and actions that will help move the world to a low-carbon economy and address the large-scale risks associated with climate change are profound and far-reaching. They require many different individuals and groups to take between them a vast array of small and large decisions, every day. Today, those decisions are made with only partial knowledge of the possible options, benefits, costs, and risks. Decision-makers are, in essence, flying blind. Whether acting globally or locally, they lack a trusted decision information infrastructure for mitigation of, and adaptation to, climate change.

The Solution

Creating a global nervous system to sense, predict and act

This lack implies that we need a new way to make collaboration possible. In many ways the solution lies literally at our fingertips. The skin that covers our bodies provides information from ‘sensors’ distributed throughout the body. Nerve endings in the skin gather sensory information and transmit it through the central nervous system for processing. The body responds with appropriate remedial action to regulate and adapt to change.

Planetary Skin can be thought of as a nervous system, covering the entire planet and providing a research and development platform for open collaboration between the public, private, academic and NGO sectors. It will collect data from space, airborne, maritime, terrestrial and people-based sensor networks and other sources of structured and unstructured data. It will model, predict, analyze and report in a standardized usable format over an open and adaptable cloud platform that is governed as a global public-good.

Today, a vast amount of data is collected daily from millions of sources across the globe, and then stored in millions of disparate silos. The proliferation of additional data created by the “Internet of Things”—where all sensors and machines that can be IP-enabled will be—can only grow the amount of data exponentially. So the problem is not the amount of data; it is that the data is isolated from other data and inputs, and cannot provide meaningful insights for decision-making and action with proper local context.

Overview

At a number of recent international meetings, public and private sector leaders agreed that in addition to appropriate target setting (eg. that follow the evolving science) and predictable large-scale financing, meeting the challenges of climate change will require the creation of transparent and trusted mechanisms for monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) and of decision-support capabilities to enable both mitigation and adaptation execution programs to address the climate change challenge. The essential preconditions to effective agreements in climate change are the trust and transparency that come from reliable and auditable measurement. We can’t manage what we can’t measure.

The transition to a low carbon economy will require a vast array of small and large decisions made by a range of governments, corporations, communities and other stakeholders. But currently they are forced to make these with only very partial information. To unlock reliable, scaleable, open participatory mechanisms to achieve trust and informed decision making we need to pool the assets and capabilities of researchers in public and private sectors, leading space agencies, NGOs, think tanks, academia and international scientific institutions. No single institution has the capabilities, assets or knowhow to complete the R&D program required on its own– national and international cross-sectoral collaborations are key.

An Evolving Partnership Model

To develop the core capabilities and applications associated to the Planetary Skin platform, a number of global and regional partnerships are in development. These will create cross-disciplinary collaboration clusters around the following areas: global platform R&D capability development (core horizontal, Earth Observation and modeling capabilities, ICT, etc); application R&D domains (core vertical capabilities in energy, water, food, land-use decision support , etc); international science and climate change policy advisory partners (contextual advisory); regional climate science/policy/technology networks (regional networks).

While development of the Planetary Skin platform is aimed at creating a vital climate change decision-support system of systems, success will also rely on drawing together experts and capabilities across sectors, institutions and regions to participate in an international system development effort. So, along with the core technical challenge, we face the need to organize scientists, engineers, policymakers, businesses, financiers and citizens into a collaborative network or ‘connected commons’. As a collective problem, climate change requires collective solutions. No single organization, enterprise or public institution or group of citizens can resolve this problem alone.

Programs like the UN’s IPCC AR5 process, the UNFCCC Adaptation Taskforce, the UN’s Global Impact and Vulnerability Alert System (GIVAS), the CGIAR Challenge on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), the Group of Earth Observation and GEOSS, the IGBP, WCRP , DIVERSITAS and IHDP programs under the Earth System Science Partnership, and WMO’s recently mandated ‘Global Framework for Climate Services’ amongst others , are needed to spur international, inter-governmental collaboration and cooperation in the policies, in the science, the modelling and in the earth observation required.

New, hybrid organizations, are needed to stimulate innovation from, create opportunities for, and leverage the capabilities of non-governmental/non-profit and private sector actors and stakeholders working with such governmental actors. Engaging such a range of organizations and partnerships in collaborative activity will fuel development, deployment, operation and sustainability of the systems and practices under development.

Cisco

In researching and developing the Planetary Skin with NASA, Cisco has been driven by the belief that the Internet is reaching its next turning point. The history of computer science has been described as a search for “what can be (efficiently) automated”. The fundamental challenge today is to look beyond this and find the best way to manage the relationship between what can be efficiently automated and what cannot – i.e. human judgments and interactions, especially across organizations and sectoral boundaries. The scale, diversity and location of the people, sensors, assets, machines, etc that will drive this phase of development requires a new set of capabilities both in and on the network. Nothing shows this more clearly than the Planetary Skin.

The Planetary Skin is a unique R&D program that will help shape the architectures, foundational technologies, tools and strategies that this next generation of the Internet will require. This fact has recently been recognized by Tim O’Reilly, originator of the phrase “Web 2.0” who, at the 2009 Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco, identified two themes he sees as key for the future of the Internet. First, he said, sensors will surpass humans in front of their keyboards as the primary data source on the web and second, Moore’s Law will need to be applied to humanity’s greatest problems.

This is the Internet that requires highly distributed and collaborative geospatial, analytical, visual, and immersive decision support platforms that aggregate other subsystems using open standards i.e. the platform of platforms.

We require a platform of platforms that integrates legacy environments, yet also provisions distributed services able to traverse firewalls, automate event management, and tap into highly distributed unified computing and scientific modeling services and utilities, as well as handling the geospatial oriented networking demands of zettabytes of data. These requirements today are only addressed in a limited way, more often in proprietary approaches in specialized settings, behind firewalls, and in client/server silos that prevent us from extracting cognitive meaning.

The key characteristic of the future of the internet though will not be technological. Rather, the future of the internet will be defined by the way it enables a loosely integrated and constantly changing fabric of communication, collaboration, tele-immersion, and data services to enhance the decision-making processes of the human network.

Governance

The PSI will be structured as a not-for-profit entity, with independent governance secured by having participants from all sectors. The PSI global network will be made up of seven peer regional hub-and-spoke networks (India, Brazil, Africa, China, Japan, EU and US) connected by a seamless collaborative network and through a shared agenda for applied research and development and common values and principles.
An auditable and open governance model is essential for replicating and scaling the Planetary Skin Institute over time.

Planetary Skin Institute

The Planetary Skin Institute (PSI) is a new organization that embodies the spirit of cooperation and open collaboration between public, private, NGO and academic sectors required to address the global challenges arising from climate change.

The transition to a low carbon economy will require a vast array of small and large decisions made by a range of governments, corporations, communities and other stakeholders. But currently they are forced to make these with only very partial information. To unlock reliable, scaleable, open participatory mechanisms to achieve trust and informed decision making we need to pool the assets and capabilities of researchers in public and private sectors, leading space agencies, NGOs, think tanks, academia and international scientific institutions. No single institution has the capabilities, assets or know-how to complete the R&D program. So national and international collaboration across sectors and disciplines is key.

PSI will research, develop and prototype an approach to provide near-to-real-time global monitoring of environmental conditions and changes. This will deliver the required decision support capabilities to manage global resources, risks and build environmental markets.

While the PSI is enabled to a great extent by advances in the technology – space, communication, computation and collaboration among them – that can deliver real-time global monitoring; human interaction and collaboration is the real engine of the programme. The coming together of opinion and willingness to act across many sectors has pushed the Planetary Skin Institute from a conceptual model towards a prototype and will secure its progress onwards to global implementation and replication. PSI places people, their energy, inventiveness and creativity at the heart of the research and development agenda. The PSI Global Advisory Council is made up from leading figures from all relevant areas of the PSI R & D programme.

Planetary Skin Global Advisory Council brief biographies:

Professor Lord Nicholas Stern (UNITED KINGDOM)

Lord Nicholas Stern is chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and IG Patel Professor at The London School of Economics and Political Science

Chief Economist of the World Bank from 2000 to 2003. Led the review into the economics of climate change that resulted in the publication of the globally influential Stern Review.

Dr. Rajendra Pachauri (INDIA)

Chair, IPCC; Director General TERI, Executive Director, Yale Climate & Energy Institute

Work as chair of the IPCC led to joint award of the Nobel Prize for Peace. And was recently awarded the second highest civilian award in India, the Padma Vibhushan.

Professor Dr. Zhou Dadi (CHINA)

Former President, Energy Research Institute, National Development Reform Commission (NDRC);

China’s lead representative to the IPCC is the founding director of the Beijing Energy Efficiency Institute and has a leading reputation globally for his work in energy and environmental policy.

Charles F. Kennel (UNITED STATES)

Director, Dean, Vice-Chancellor, and Professor Emeritus Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Has served on Presidential Commissions and chaired National Research Committees and Boards. Chair of the NASA Advisory Council from 2001 – 2005. Was Associate Administrator at NASA for Mission to Planet Earth 1996-98.

Dr. Carlos Nobre (BRAZIL)

Director, Centre for Earth Science Research, National Space Research Institute; International Chair of International Biosphere Geosphere Programme and Chair of the National Panel of Climate Change

Author of the internationally influential hypothesis on the savannization of the Amazon rainforest, he was jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for this work with the IPCC.

Professor Sir Brian Hoskins (UNITED KINGDOM)

Director, Grantham Institute for Climate Change, Imperial College London; Member of the UK Government’s Climate Change Committee

A world authority on climate issues and global weather patterns, he was a member of the IPCC team awarded the Nobel Peace prize. Chair of Scientific Committee of the UK Met Office Hadley Centre.

Professor Coleen Vogel (SOUTH AFRICA)

Chair of Sustainability, School of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Witwatersrand;

Past Chair of the International Scientific Committee of the International Human Dimensions Programme (IHDP). Advises a number of South African government departments and Africa’s NEPAD on vulnerability decision-support.

Professor Taroh Matsuno (JAPAN)

Director-General of the Frontier Research System for Global Change (FRSGC)

His expertise includes meteorology, especially large-scale atmosphere dynamics, and climate dynamics. Awarded the prestigious United States AMS Life Achievement Award. He has been serving as the Director-General of FRSGC, and also as the Director of Integrated Modeling Research Program as an additional post.

Dr. Phil Sharp (UNITED STATES)

President of Resources for the Future

A leading authority on US energy policy and a distinguished record of public service, with ten terms as member of the House of Representatives for Indiana. He has been at the forefront of critical US energy policies over the last two decades. Has held Chairs in Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Dr Steve Howard (UNITED KINGDOM)

CEO, The Climate Group, Chair of WEF’s Global Agenda Council on Climate Change

Has advised numerous leading CEOs, companies and government leaders on climate change. Has focused on catalyzing global and regional public private partnerships to rapidly transition to a low carbon economy.

KEY PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

The PSI’s program’s activities will take place in seven regional hubs across the world, in several phases. The key products of PSI will focus on:

  • Undertaking rapid prototyping projects that demonstrate value to decision-makers coordinated through global network, governance, outreach and R&D agenda
  • Providing unique global data sets and modeling outputs through PSI’s open climate change decision support cloud infrastructure
  • Hosting the Global Climate Solutions Exchange for the benefit of policymakers, businesses and communities globally to jumpstart execution towards a low carbon economy
  • Development of the roadmaps and business plans for the public-private partnerships to enable replication and scaling of the Planetary Skin platforms
  • Facilitating the transition of prototypes into operation through both open source/innovation and venturing

During my derelict’ion this year we’ve had plenty of remarkable Technocrat / Transhumanist happenings. So with this entry lets get up to speed on noteworthy items from 2009. The mad scientists have been very busy, and their news items of IIF context almost seemed to increase each month as time progressed.

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Technology predictions for 2010
Telegraph Dec. 24, 2009
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The rise of the tablet computer (led by Apple), broadband-enabled on-demand TV, real-time social websites, 3D TV, and augmented reality in information and location-based games are the hot consumer electronics trends for 2010 predicted by the Telegraph’s technology team….

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2010 preview: Is this the year that we create life?
New Scientist Life Dec. 21, 2009
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Craig Venter hopes to unveil a living bacterial cell carrying a genome made from scratch in the lab. George Church of Harvard University expects to get synthetic ribosomes to self-replicate. A completely
synthetic cell remains a distant goal, however….

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The Year in Robotics
Technology Review Dec. 29, 2009
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In 2009, researchers have developed new robots to tackle a variety of
tasks: helping with medical rehabilitation, aiding military maneuvers, mimicking social skills, grabbing new objects quickly and robustly, and achieving superior mobility, such as squeezing under doors or through tiny openings, or navigating a cluttered…

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The Year in Energy
Technology Review Dec. 28, 2009
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Liquid batteries, giant lasers, and vast new reserves of natural gas
highlight the fundamental energy advances of the past 12…

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The Year in Biomedicine
Technology Review Dec. 22, 2009
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Advances in antiaging drugs, acoustic brain surgery, flu vaccines–and the secret to…

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The Year Online
Technology Review Dec. 23, 2009
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This year will be remembered for cloud computing, real-time search, and the appearance of Google’s Web-based operating…

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A Review Of The Best Robots of 2009
Singularity Hub Dec. 22, 2009
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In 2009, robots continued their advances in industrial/manufacturing, humanoid, and other areas….

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Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time
PhysOrg.com Dec. 21, 2009
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By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in
syndrome, researchers led by Boston University and Harvard/MIT
scientists have demonstrated the first brain-machine interface to
wirelessly transmit neural signals from implanted electrodes to a
speech synthesizer for real-time synthetic speech production.

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The Body Electric
New York Times Dec. 24, 2009
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Robot cars, remote-controlled and mobile robotic surgeons, and wireless artificial arms are some of the ways DARPA is remaking our world as portrayed in THE DEPARTMENT OF MAD SCIENTISTS…

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Building a Search Engine of the Brain, Slice by Slice
New York Times Dec. 21, 2009
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A “Google Earthlike search engine,” the first entirely reconstructed, whole-brain atlas with resolution all the way down to the level of single cells–2.5 petabytes of information– will be available at the Brain Observatory at U.C. San Diego to anyone who wants to log…

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THE SCIENCE OF AVATAR
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 28, 2009
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James Cameron has created a whole ecosystem, from semi-intelligent trees to giant land and air creatures…. [He] has taken the Gaia hypothesis, that the biosphere of the Earth is itself a kind of living entity, and sexed it up — the biosphere of Pandora is essentially a god, and it’s networked! Creatures can plug into each other via what…

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Singularity University announces second Executive Program
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 28, 2009

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Singularity University has announced its second 10-Day Executive Program, to take place Feb. 26 to Mar. 7, 2010. Targeted to decision-makers, strategists, CEOs, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and government leaders, the program concentrates on six exponentially
growing technologies: Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, Nanotechnology,…

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Conference brings together nanomedicine and telemedicine
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 24, 2009
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The Unither Nanomedical & Telemedical Technology Conference (Quebec, February 23-26, 2010) will focus on development of medical
nanobots and nanomedical therapies, nanomedical pharmaceuticals,
nano-bio interfaces and hybrids, systems biology to accelerate
nanomedical therapies, and telemanagement of miniature in-vivo medical devices, with a keynote by Ray Kurzweil.

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Looking Back at the 100 Best Innovations of 2009
Popular Science Dec. 23, 2009
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A robot that uses whiskers instead of cameras to see in the dark, a personal video network that lets users place cordless cameras virtually anywhere and view video in real time on the Web, and an electronic stethoscope that beams sounds to a doctor’s PC by Bluetooth and renders a near-real-time graphical representation of the sounds onscreen are…

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Controlling the TV with a wave of the hand
PhysOrg.com Dec. 23, 2009
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Consumer devices for 3D gesture recognition for controlling TVs, videogames, and personal computers, using a camera in real time to
capture motion, are coming in 2010 from a number of companies, including Softkinetic/Texas Instruments and…

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Do computers understand art?
PhysOrg.com Dec. 23, 2009
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Certain artificial-vision algorithms can differentiate between artistic styles and periods based on low-level pictorial information, such as pixel and color distribution, diversity of the color palette, and entropy (degree of disorder), researchers at the University of Girona and the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics have found….

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Scientists discover how the brain encodes memories at a cellular level
PhysOrg.com Dec. 23, 2009
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When synapses are strengthened during learning, one of the proteins
wrapped around the synapse’s silencing complex (keeps a synapse from being strengthened) gets degraded, freeing RNA to synthesize a new protein, scientists at UC Santa Barbara have…

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Scientists create world’s first molecular transistor
PhysOrg.com Dec. 23, 2009
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The first transistor made from a single molecule has been created by
researchers from Yale University and the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea. The researchers were able to manipulate a benzene molecule’s different energy states, depending on the voltage they applied to it through gold contacts, to control the
current…

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Scientists take important step toward the proverbial fountain of youth
PhysOrg.com Dec. 22, 2009
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Reduced glucose caused normal lung cells to have a higher activity of the gene that dictates the level of telomerase (an enzyme that extends their lifespan) and lower activity of a gene that slows their growth, University of Alabama researchers have found….

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The sinister powers of crowdsourcing
New Scientist Tech Dec. 22, 2009
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Crowdsourcing’s power to compartmentalize and abstract away the true meaning of tasks could potentially entice people into participating in a covert project that they otherwise wouldn’t support, using a tool such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, says Harvard University law professor
Jonathan…

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Working as a Team, Bacteria Spin Gears
New York Times Dec. 21, 2009
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Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern and Princeton have shown that the collective swimming behavior of bacteria can be harnessed for work, a step toward the development of
hybrid biological and micromechanical…

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Switchable Nanostructures Made with DNA
PhysOrg.com Dec. 21, 2009
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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National
Laboratory have found a new way to use a synthetic form of double-stranded DNA for programmable self-assembly of nanoparticles. It could allow for switchable, three-dimensional and small-cluster structures that might be useful, for example, as biosensors, in solar
cells, and as…

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Scientists improve chip memory by stacking cells
PhysOrg.com Dec. 21, 2009
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Scientists at Arizona State University have developed a way to create inexpensive, high-density data storage by stacking memory layers inside a single…

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Snap and Search (No Words Needed)
New York Times Dec. 19, 2009
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Google’s massive data centers with their computing power and more than a billion images allow its Goggles image-recognition smartphone app to recognize millions of images…

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Complex Integrated Circuits Made of Carbon Nanotubes
Technology Review Dec. 17, 2009
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The first three-dimensional carbon nanotube circuits, made by researchers at Stanford University, could be an important step in making nanotube computers in the coming decade that could be faster and use less power than today’s silicon chips. The Stanford nanotube arrays are some of the densest ever made, with five to 10 nanotubes per…

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New Technique Detects Proteins That Make Us Age
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 15, 2009
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University of Bath researchers have developed a new technique that could be used to diagnose and develop treatments for age-related
conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes and cancer. In these
diseases, proteins in the body react with sugars in a process called glycation. This modifies the protein’s function and can trigger complications…

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Scientists decode memory-forming brain cell conversations
PhysOrg.com Dec. 16, 2009
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The conversations neurons have as they form and recall memories in real time have been decoded by Medical College of Georgia scientists. The finding could help pinpoint at what stage memory formation is flawed and whether drugs are improving it. They inserted 128 electrodes in the hippocampus of mice to record the conversations of 200 to 300…

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Japanese Store Selling Custom-Made Robots That Look Like Their Owners
PhysOrg.com Dec. 14, 2009
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Japanese department store Sogo & Seibu plans to offer robots that are
custom-made to look just like their owners. They will be life-size humanoids that can dpeak with a real person’s (recorded) voice….

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Computing with a wave of the hand
PhysOrg.com Dec. 11, 2009
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A display that lets users manipulate on-screen images using hand gestures has been developed by the MIT Media Lab. (Matthew Hirsch, Douglas Lanman, Ramesh Raskar, Henry…

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Motion-sensing phones that predict your every move
New Scientist Tech Dec. 13, 2009
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A system that learns users’ behavior patterns to provide them with an enhanced cellphone service has been developed by Technical University of Delft communications engineers. The system uses telltale
sequences and timings from the phone’s accelerometer and other devices to create an electronic signature of “mobility events.” A neural network…

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Popeye, the robot with brains not brawn
WIRED.CO.UK Dec. 10, 2009
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European researchers have developed a new approach to artificial intelligence that could empower computers to respond intelligently to human behaviour as well as commands. Their robot, named Popeye, was built to work out which voices are “relevant” among a cacophony of
noise by combining video input and image recognition technology with
sound…

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How Much Information? 2009 Report on American Consumers
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 10, 2009
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The average American consumes 34 gigabytes of content and 100,000
words of information in a single day (excluding work information) — 11.8 hours of information — according to a report by the University of
California, San Diego. U.S. information consumption in 2008
totaled 3.6 zettabytes (10^21 bytes) and 10,845 trillion words. Video…

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Kurzweil, Chinese Singularity featured in Winter h+ magazine
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 9, 2009
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The Winter 2009 Issue of h+ Magazine, just out, includes The Ray Kurzweil Interview, CAPRICA: Birth of the Cylons, DIY  Transhumanism, Nano-Bio-Info-Cogno: Paradigm for the Future, and The Chinese Singularity (“Chinese culture has little of the West’s subliminal resistance to thinking machines or immortal people and this cultural difference may…

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Google Reinvents Search For Mobile Era
InformationWeek Dec. 8, 2009
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Google is deepening its commitment to new modes of search: by voice, location, and sight. Google on Monday announced: 1) the inclusion of real-time information in Google search results; 2) Google Goggles, an experimental image recognition system for Android 1.6+ devices by which users can submit search queries using snapshots of certain…

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Optimism as Artificial Intelligence Pioneers Reunite
New York Times Dec. 7, 2009
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Four and a half decades after the first research in artificial intelligence, much of the original optimism is back, driven by rapid progress in AI technologies, and that sense was tangible last month when more than 200 of the original Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory scientists assembled at Stanford for a two-day…

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You’ll buy more from web ads that know how you think
New Scientist Tech Dec. 7, 2009
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An “ad morphing” system that serves up banner ads that fit a website user’s personality type has been developed by MIT Sloan School of Management researchers. It uses a program called the Bayesian Inference Engine running unobtrusively on a user’s computer to monitor the person’s click patterns to determine how they respond to different…

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Researchers show brain waves can ‘write’ on a computer in early tests
PhysOrg.com Dec. 7, 2009
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Brain waves can be used to type alphanumerical characters on a computer screen by merely focusing on a letter, with near 100 percent accuracy, Mayo Clinic and University of North Florida researchers  have found. They used electrocorticography (ECoG), in which electrodes are placed directly on the surface of the brain in patients to record…

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Organovo Has Its First Commercial 3D Bioprinter
Singularity Hub Dec. 3, 2009
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Organovo has developed a research prototype of a bioprinter capable of producing very basic tissues like blood vessels….

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The Race to Reverse Engineer the Human Brain
H+ Magazine Nov. 30, 2009
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IBM’s recent announcement of simulation of a cat’s cortext on a Dawn Blue Gene/P Supercomputer aligns with IBM’s “smarter planet” initiative, a method of integrating sensors into infrastructure and analyzing the data they produce to optimize systems like the electrical grid, water systems, and traffic….

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Reverse-engineering the human visual system using molecular biology and GPUs
KurzweilAI.net Dec. 3, 2009
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Harvard and MIT researchers have demonstrated a way to build more powerful artificial visual systems, taking inspiration from screening
techniques in molecular biology (a multitude of candidate organisms or
compounds are screened in parallel to find those that have a particular
property of interest). “Reverse-engineering a biological
visual…

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Cray studies exascale computing in Europe
EE Times Dec. 2, 2009
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Cray Inc. has announced three European partners for a new program
aimed at delivering by the end of the decade a supercomputer capable
of performing an exaflop, one quintillion calculations per…

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Nanowires Key to Future Transistors, Electronics
Science Daily Dec. 3, 2009
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A method for creating nanowire transistors with layers of silicon and germanium sharply defined at the atomic level has been developed by
researchers at IBM, Purdue University and UCLA. The nanowires are “grown” vertically, so they have a smaller footprint, which could make it possible to fit more transistors on a chip, extending Moore’s law….

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Study reveals people’s thoughts on living longer
PhysOrg.com Nov. 30, 2009
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In a study if which people were given a hypothetical pill to make them live longer, 63 percent of participants said there would be personal benefits to life extension, including spending more time with family (36 percent); having more time in life to achieve ambitions (31 percent); and better health and quality of life (21 percent), according to a…

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IBM Cat Brain Simulation Dismissed as ‘Hoax’ by Rival Scientist
New York Times Nov. 24, 2009
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IBM’s claim that it has designed the first brain simulation to exceed the scale of a cat’s cortex is being dismissed as “a hoax and a PR stunt” by Henry Markram, director of the Blue Brain Project in Switzerland, which is also attempting to reverse-engineer mammalian brains. Markram said the cat brain simulation involves only “point neurons,”…

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Machine Converts CO2 into Gasoline, Diesel, and Jet Fuel
PhysOrg.com Nov. 23, 2009
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Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have built a machine that uses the sun’s energy to convert carbon dioxide waste from power plants into transportation fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The system could provide an alternative to carbon sequestration; instead of permanently storing CO2 underground, the CO2 could be…

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Shared Supercomputing and Everyday Research
New York Times Nov.; 22, 2009
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Researchers and others are moving to a cloud-computing infrastructure
to allow access to supercomputer resources by individual scientists
and organizations around the globe, reducing the need for smaller
universities and labs to spend money on their own computing
infrastructure while opening access to formerly private medical and
other scientific…

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The Methuselah Manifesto
Reason.com Nov. 17, 2009
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Maximum Life Foundation president David Kekich gathered a group of
scientists, entrepreneurs, and visionaries to meet for three days with the goal of developing a scientific and business strategy to make extreme human life extension a real possibility within a couple of decades, dubbed the Manhattan Beach Project….

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A Central Nervous System for Earth: HP’s Ambitious Sensor Network
New York Times Nov. 18, 2009
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HP Labs has announced a project that aims to be a “Central Nervous System for the Earth” (CeNSE): a R&D program to build a planetwide sensing network, using billions of tiny accelerometers that detect motion and vibrations, and later, ones for light, temperature, barometric pressure, airflow and humidity. The nodes could be stuck to bridges…

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Intel: Chips in brains will control computers by 2020
Computerworld Nov. 19, 2009
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By the year 2020, you won’t need a keyboard and mouse to control your
computer, say Intel Corp. researchers, who are close to gaining the ability to build brain sensing technology into a headset that culd be used to  manipulate a computer, working with associates at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. Their next step is…

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Innovation: The dizzying ambition of Wolfram Alpha
New Scientist Tech Nov. 17, 2009
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Stephen Wolfram wants Wolfram Alpha to generate knowledge of its own. Alpha has been exposed to more utterances than a typical child would hear in learning a new language, allowing it to get smarter at understanding how people phrase their requests, he says. “You’ll be able to ask it a question, and
instead of it using knowledge that came…

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The cat is out of the bag: cortical simulations with 10^9 neurons, 10^13 synapses
KurzweilAI.net Nov. 18, 2009
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Results of massively parallel cortical simulations of a cat cortex, with 1.5 billion neurons and 9 trillion synapses, running on Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Dawn Blue Gene/P supercomputer, will be presented by IBM and LLNL researchers today at the SC09 Conference on High Performance Networking and Computing in Portland. “The…

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Supercomputers with 100 million cores coming by 2018
Computerworld Nov. 16, 2009
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The U.S. Department of Energy has begun holding workshops on building
a system that’s 1,000 times more powerful than today’s top supercomputer (Jaquar’s 2.3 petaflops): an exascale (10^18 calculations per second)  system, which would likely arrive around the year 2018. Exascale systems will be needed for high-resolution climate models, bio…

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How Will We Keep Supercomputing Super?
New York Times Nov. 16, 2009
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Building an exascale supercomputer that can deliver a billion billion (10^18) calculations per second is going to force designers to change the way they think about putting these supercomputers together. Graphics processors (GPUs) are the first step in that process, although more esoteric technologies may…

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Google Submits Second Proposal for Library of the Future
Wired Nov. 16, 2009
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Google and a coalition of authors and publishers are hoping a second draft of a legal settlement will clear the way through a thicket of copyright laws to let Google build the library of the…

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Singularity University Executive Program: Ray Kurzweil’s Opening Address
TechCrunch Nov. 13, 2009
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Over the last week, Singularity University has been holding an Executive Program with the goal of preparing executives for the “imminent disruption and opportunities resulting from exponentially accelerating technologies.”…

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Listen, Watch, Read: Computers Search for Meaning
Science Daily Nov. 16, 2009
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European researchers in the MESH project have created the first integrated semantic search platform that integrates text, video and audio. The platform can search annotated files from any type of media — photographs, videos, sound recordings, text, document scans — using optical character  recognition, automated speech recognition and…

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Tiny Particles Can Deliver Antioxidant Enzyme to Injured Heart Cells
ScienceDaily Nov. 16, 2009
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Georgia Tech scientists have developed microscopic polymer beads that can deliver an antioxidant enzyme made naturally by the body into the heart, reducing the number of dying cells and resulting in improved heart function in rats. The enzyme in the particles, called superoxide dismutase (SOD), soaks up toxic free radicals produced when cells…

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Cray’s Jaquar now world’s fastest supercomputer
KurzweilAI.net Nov. 15, 2009
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The Jaguar Cray supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has become the world’s most powerful supercomputer, at 1.75 petaflops per second, edging out the IBM Roadrunner system at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, which has slowed slightly to 1.04 petaflops per second. The newest version of the…

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Medibots: The world’s smallest surgeons
New Scientist Health Nov. 20, 2009
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Advances in robotics could revolutionize healthcare, pushing the limits of what surgeons can achieve, from worm-inspired capsules to crawl through your gut, and systems swallowed in pieces that assemble themselves inside the body, to surgical robots that will soon be ready to embark on a fantastic voyage through our bodies, homing in on the part…

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Contact lenses to get built-in virtual graphics
New Scientist Tech Nov. 12, 2009
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University of Washington researchers are developing a contact lens with embedded microelectronics for overlaying graphics on the real world that could provide a compelling augmented reality…

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Wireless Phones Can Affect The Brain, Swedish Study Suggests
Science Daily Nov. 11, 2009
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A study at Orebro University in Sweden indicates that mobile phones
and other cordless telephones have at two biological effects on the
brain: increased content of the protein transthyretin in the blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier (part of the brain’s protection against outside influences), and various health symptoms reported by children and…

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New search technique for images and videos has broad applications
Physorg.com Nov. 10, 2009
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Engineers at the University of California, Santa Cruz have developed a new approach to a fundamental problem in computer vision: how to program a computer to recognize or categorize what it “sees” in an image or video. The software analyzes the map of pixel relationships and determines the salient geometric features of the object or action….

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DARPA: Inventing this side of the impossible
New Scienist Opinion Nov. 11, 2009
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Prosthetic arms as nimble and light as the real thing, driverless cars that work their way through real traffic, a portable robotic emergency room, and scramjets able to race around the world in just a few hours are among the DARPA projects profiled by journalist Michael Belfiore in a new book, The Department of Mad Scientists….

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A Battery-Free Implantable Neural Sensor
Technology Review Nov. 5, 2009
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Electrical engineers at the University of Washington have developed an implantable neural sensing chip that needs less power, drawing power from a RFID reader radio source up to a meter away. (Brian Otis, University of Washington) The NeuralWISP is a collection of smaller,  more low-power components, such as a specialized signal amplifier,…

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Sony demos game controller to track motion and emotion
New Scientist Tech Nov. 5, 2009
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Sony has unveiled a hands-free, full-body game controller, the Interactive Communication Unit (ICU). Like Microsoft’s Natal, Sony’s ICU tracks a person’s whole body without their having to wear the body markers used in motion-capture studios, and it can detect a player’s emotions by watching their facial expressions, and judge sex and…

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AI Spacesuits Turn Astronauts Into Cyborg Biologists
Wired Science Nov. 2, 2009
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Patrick McGuire, a University of Chicago geoscientist, has developed algorithms that can recognize signs of life in a barren landscape, using a Hopfield neural network, which compares incoming data against patterns it’s seen before, picking out those details that qualify as new or…

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Breakthrough In Industrial-scale Nanotube Processing
ScienceDaily Nov. 3, 2009
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Rice University scientists have unveiled a method for high-throughput industrial-scale processing of carbon-nanotube fibers, using chlorosulfonic acid as a solvent. The process that could lead to revolutionary advances in materials science, power distribution and nanoelectronics….

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The Future of Video Game Input: Muscle Sensors
Live Science Oct. 29, 2009
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A muscle-sensing system that can remotely control devices such as games and multi-touch surfaces has been developed by researchers at Microsoft, the University of Washington, and the University of Toronto. They system uses electromyography (EMG) sensors to detect muscle  signals from the arm skin’s surface, allowing researchers to build a…

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Xerox Claims Printable Electronics Breakthrough
PC magazine Oct. 27, 2009
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Xerox has announced a new silver ink that is apparently a breakthrough in printable electronics. The possibilities range from printing on flexible plastic, paper and cardboard, and fabric, to printing RFID tags on almost anything….

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Brain scanners can tell what you’re thinking about

Oct. 28, 2009
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Neuroscientists can now use “neural decoding” to recreate moving images that volunteers are viewing, read memories and future plans, diagnose eating disorders, and detect which of two nouns a subject is thinking of, all at rates well above…

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Meet BigDog’s Two-Legged Brother
Technology Review Oct. 27, 2009
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Petman, a bipedal bot that walks on two legs and can recover from a push (using the same balancing technology that allows BigDog to recover from a kick) has been developed by Boston Dynamics….

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Muscle-Bound Computer Interface
Technology Review Oct. 28, 2009
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A gesture-based system using electrodes attached to a person’s forearm that read electrical activity from different arm muscles to allow for hands-free, gestural interaction have been developed by researchers at Microsoft, the
University of Washington in Seattle, and the University of…

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Google Launches Google Social Search Amid Social-Media Battle
Wall Street Journal Oct. 26, 2009
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Google’s new Social Search allows users to find postings from their friends as part of a Web search….

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New Route To Nano Self-assembly Found
ScienceDaily Oct. 25, 2009
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Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have found a way to induce nanoparticles to assemble themselves into complex arrays, using block copolymers with surfactants as mediator molecules….

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Augmented reality system lets you see through walls
New Scientist Tech Oct. 23, 2009
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An augmented reality system has been built by Carnegie Mellon University researchers that gives the impression that one is seeing through walls. It uses two cameras: one that captures the driver’s view and a second that sees the scene behind a view-blocking wall. A computer takes the feed from the second camera and layers it on top of the…

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Head-up Displays go Holographic
Technology Review Oct. 16, 2009
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A new compact projection device developed by Light Blue Optics uses “holographic projection*,” allowing it to be far smaller than current in-car head-up display** (HUD) systems — small enough to fit inside a rearview mirror. * Holographic projectors use liquid crystal on silicon to modulate beams of red, green, and blue laser light to…

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Artificial Black Hole Created in Chinese Lab
the physics arXiv blog Oct. 14, 2009
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Chinese scientista have used metamaterials to create the world’s first artificial black hole in their lab, distorting space so severely that light entering it (in this case microwaves) cannot escape. Their black hole consists of 60 layers of
printed circuit board arranged in concentric circles and coated in a thin layer of copper from which…

IIB Note: Are Black Holes the future of weaponry?

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Researchers Probe Computer ‘Commonsense Knowledge’
ScienceDaily Oct. 11, 2009
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University of Illinois at Chicago AI scientists were recently awarded a three-year, $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop algorithms for use in building commonsense knowledge bases that can evolve. They will consider questions such as how to deal with contradictory information that is entered and how to organize knowledge in…

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Google Wave 101
Search Engine Watch Oct. 12, 2009
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The revolutionary new Google Wave communication platform attempts to bring together your favorite online communication options, combining the features of instant messaging, e-mail programs, the viral aspects of social  media, Twitter, maps, and document sharing into one program….

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Military Robots to Get a Virtual Touch
Technology Review Oct. 6, 2009
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Adding force sensing to a PackBot robot arm could give operators the ability to “feel” the weight of an object or whether it is hard or soft, via the robot’s arms. The US military currently uses iRobot’s wheeled PackBot in Iraq and
Afghanistan for tasks such as bomb disposal, detecting hazardous materials and carrying…

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Brain-to-brain communication demonstrated
KurzweilAI.net Oct. 7, 2009
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Brain-to-brain (“B2B”) communication has been achieved for the first time by Dr. Christopher James of the University of Southampton. While attached to an EEG amplifier, the first person generated and transmitted a series of binary digits by imagining moving their left arm for zero and their right arm for one. That data was sent via the…

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Singularity Summit media page launched
KurzweilAI.net Oct. 5, 2009
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The Singularity Summit has launched a media page for uploading videos (including some SS09 sessions), photos, and tweets (#SS09)….

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Redesigning Humanity panel update
KurzweilAI.net Oct. 2, 2009
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The “Redesigning Humanity” panel with James Hughes, Ray Kurzweil, Martine Rothblatt, and Wendell Wallach at the Woodstock Film Festival mentioned yesterday will be held at 4 pm ET Friday, October 2, viewable live via streaming video….

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A Genetic Fountain of Youth
Technology Review Oct. 1, 2009
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By disabling a gene involved in an important biochemical signaling pathway involving a protein called target of rapamycin (TOR), scientists have discovered a way to mimic the anti-aging benefits of caloric restriction, allowing mice to live longer and healthier lives. This finding offers a promising drug target for combating the many health…

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Free-flying cyborg insects steered from a distance
New Scientist Tech Oct. 1, 2009
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By connecting electrodes and radio antennas to the nervous systems of beetles, University of California, Berkeley engineers were able to make them take off, dive and turn on command. Funded by DARPA, the project’s goal is to create fully remote-controlled insects able to perform tasks such as looking for survivors after a disaster, or acting as…

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Scientists Develop Nasal Spray That Improves Memory
ScienceDaily Oct.. 2, 2009
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A molecule from the body’s immune system (interleukin-6) administered through the nose helps the brain retain emotional and procedural memories during REM sleep, researchers from University of Lubeck in Germany have found….

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‘2B – The Era of Flesh is Over’ film to premiere at Woodstock Film Festival Friday
KurzweilAI.net Oct. 1, 2009
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“2B – The Era of Flesh is Over,” a science-fiction film set in the near future, will have its world premiere at the 10th anniversary Woodstock Film Festival in Woodstock, NY on Friday, Oct. 2, 2009. A panel discussion, “Redesigning Humanity — The New Frontier,” moderated by bioethicist James J. Hughes,
including Ray Kurzweil, 2B film executive…

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Touchless 3-D Fingerprinting
Technology Review Sept. 30, 2009
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With a new non-contact, 3-D fingerprinting system that projects patterns of light onto a finger and analyzes the 1000 pixels-per-inch image, University of Kentucky researchers can quickly create a more accurate print than those made with ink or sensor plates and significantly reduce incorrect matches and environmental problems.

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New project to create ‘FutureGrid’ computer network
PhysOrg.com Sept. 29, 2009
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The San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego is part of a team chosen by the National Science Foundation to build and run an experimental high-performance grid test-bed, allowing researchers to collaboratively develop and test new approaches to parallel, grid and cloud computing. FutureGrid, to be composed of nearly 1400 state-of-the-art…

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Bell Labs breaks optical transmission record, 100 Petabit per second kilometer barrier
PhysOrg.com Sept. 29, 2009
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Bell Labs scientists have set a new optical transmission record of 15.5 Terabits per second over 7,000 kilometers, using 155 lasers, each operating at a different frequency and carrying 100 Gigabits/second of data. The researchers also increased capacity by interfacing advanced digital signal processors with coherent detection, a new technology…

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A step toward better brain implants using conducting polymer nanotubes
PhysOrg.com Sept. 29, 2009
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Brain implants developed at the University of Michigan are coated with nanotubes made of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), a biocompatible and electrically conductive polymer that has been shown to record neural signals better than conventional metal electrodes….

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Quest for a Long Life Gains Scientific Respect
New York Times Sept. 28, 2009
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Several proteins are now known to influence longevity, energy use and the response to caloric restriction, including sirtuins (thought to help the body ride out famines), receptors for insulin, IGF-1, and TOR (“target of  rapamycin”) — an antimicrobial that was recently found to extend lifespan
significantly, even when given to mice at an advanced…

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Wanted: Home Computers to Join in Research on Artificial Life
New York Times Sept. 28, 2009
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Silicon Valley researchers at Digital Space plan to turn software originally designed to search for evidence of extraterrestrial life to the task of looking for evidence of artificial life, using hundreds of thousands of Internet-connected computers in homes and offices. A concept view of an artificial
protocell forming in the EvoGrid

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Discovery Brings New Type Of Fast Computers Closer To Reality
ScienceDaily Sept. 28, 2009
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UC San Diego physicists have created integrated circuits with particles called “excitons” at 125 degrees Kelvin (can be easily attained commercially with liquid nitrogen), bringing the possibility of a new type of extremely fast
computer based on excitons closer to reality. Excitons are pairs of negatively charged electrons and positively…

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Cracking The Brain’s Numerical Code: Researchers Can Tell What Number A Person Has Seen
ScienceDaily Sept. 25, 2009
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By carefully observing and analyzing the pattern of activity in the brain, researchers have found that they can tell what number a person has just seen, or how many dots a person has been presented with. These findings confirm the notion that numbers are encoded in the brain via detailed and specific activity…

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Augmented Reality in a Contact Lens
IEEE Spectrum September 2009
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University of Washington researchers are developing optoelectronic systems embedded in a contact lens to create Terminator-like augmented-reality
displays and for noninvasive monitoring of the wearer’s biomarkers (such as glucose levels) and other health indicators on the surface of the eye. One lens prototype [top] has several…

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Video surveillance system that reasons like a human brain
Security News Sept. 21, 2009
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“AlSight Cognitive Video Analytics,” an autonomous video-surveillance system tbat uses cognitive learning engines and computer vision to process visual data on a level similar to the human brain, has been developed by BRS Labs. It is used to protect global critical infrastructure assets, including major international hotels, banking…

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EU funding ‘Orwellian’ artificial intelligence plan to monitor public for “abnormal behaviour”
Telegraph Sept. 21, 2009
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The EU’s Project Indect aims to develop computer programs that monitor and process information from web sites, discussion forums, file servers, peer-to-peer networks and even individual computers for “automatic detection of threats, abnormal behavior, or…

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What’s Augmented Reality’s Killer App?
Technology Review Sept. 23, 2009
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With Mobilizy’s just-released Augmented Reality Mark-up Language (ARML), programmers can more easily create location-based content for AR applications — the equivalent of HTML for the Web….

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Machines could ultimately match human intelligence, says Intel CTO
Network World Sept. 21, 2009
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“It’s not inconceivable we’ll reach a point that machines do match human intelligence,” said Intel CTO Justin Rattner, referring to the concept of the technological Singularity. Rattner said the fundamental technologies behind a future exaflop machine could be demonstrated by the middle of next decade, and — depending on government investment…

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Super-dense data stores cool down
New Scientist Tech Sept. 17, 2009
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A material that could allow super-dense (125 gigabytes per square inch) “millipede”-style data storage systems to work at room temperature (and thus be a viable commercial product) has been developed by researchers at Pohang University of Science and Technology in Kyungbuk, Korea. The system uses a “baroplastic” — a hard polymer that becomes…

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Robots get smarter by asking for help
New Scientist Tech Sept. 17, 2009
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Willow Garage researchers are training a robot to ask humans to identify objects it doesn’t recognize, working with Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, an online marketplace that pairs up workers with employers that have simple
tasks they need completing. A cleaning robot, for example, could spend its first week in a new building taking pictures and…

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Snort stem cells to get them to brain
NewScientist Health Sept. 10, 2009
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Snorting stem cells might be a way of getting large numbers of stem cells or therapeutic proteins such as neural growth factor into the brain without surgery, University Hospital of Tübingen researchers have found in an
experiment with…

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Electrical circuit runs entirely off power in trees
PhysOrg.com Sept. 8, 2009
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University of Washington researchers have tapped electrical power from trees to run low-power (10 nanowatts) sensors….

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Scientist: Human brain could be replicated in 10 years
PhysOrg.com Sept. 7, 2009
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A model that replicates the functions of the human brain is feasible in 10 years according to neuroscientist Professor Henry Markram of the Brain Mind Institute in Switzerland. Inhibitory neurons in the neocortex (Blue Brain Project, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne) “A brain model
will sit on a massive supercomputer and serve as…

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Smart People to Blame for Central Planning
The Daily Reckoning Sept. 7, 2009
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Central planning didn’t work in Russia or China — or in the 2007-2008 financial blow-up — but today, in China, the government boosts production, and in America, the central planners are trying to boost consumption, says investment author Bill Bonner. “In short, the fixers are still fixing. And soon,
the world will be in an even worse fix…

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Chemists reach from the molecular to the real world with creation of 3-D DNA crystals
PhysOrg.com Sept. 2, 2009
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Self-assembled 3D DNA crystals that could be used for smaller and more sophisticated nanoelectronics devices and organizing biological macromolecules have been developed by NYU, Purdue, and Argonne  National Laboratory scientists….

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Researchers grow nanowire crystals for 3-D microchips
PhysOrg.com Aug. 26, 2009
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Stanford researchers have developed a method of stacking and purifying multiple crystal layers of germanium onto silicon that may pave the way for three-dimensional microchips that produce more computing power per unit of surface area….

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Mining the Web for Feelings, Not Facts
New York Times Aug. 23, 2009
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An emerging field known as sentiment analysis, fueled by social networking, is taking shape around one of the computer world’s unexplored frontiers: translating human emotions into hard data, which could eventually transform the experience of searching for information…

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Are we ready for the Autonomous Age?
NewScientist Tech Aug. 20, 2009
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The media and government should improve public awareness of the complex social, ethical and legal questions that autonomous systems (like autonomous vehicles and smart homes) raise, the UK’s Royal Academy of Engineering argues in a new report….

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Robots ‘Evolve’ the Ability to Deceive
Technology Review Aug. 18, 2009
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Robots equipped with artificial neural networks and programmed to find “food” eventually learned to conceal their visual signals from other robots to keep the food for themselves, researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland have found. (PNAS) The team “evolved” new generations of robots by copying and…

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New Nanolaser Key To Future Optical Computers And Technologies
ScienceDaily Aug. 17, 2009
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The “spaser,” the tiniest laser since its invention nearly 50 years ago, paves the way for a host of innovations, including “hyperlenses” resulting in sensors and microscopes 10 times more powerful than today’s and able to see objects as small as DNA, super-fast computers and consumer electronics that use light instead of electronic signals to…

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Sony patents reveal emotion recognition software
gamesindustry.biz August 16, 2009
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Sony Computer Entertainment America has filed patents for software that can recognize emotions, including, laughter, sadness, joy, anger and boredom. The patents may be related to Sony’s PlayStation 3 motion-tacking  technology, which can detect facial expressions, and sound similar to Microsoft’s Project Natal, which can detect emotional…

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Twitter Forty Percent ‘Pointless Babble’
Information Week Aug. 16, 2009
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40.55 percent of tweets are pointless babble, 3.75 percent is spam, and 5.85 percent is self-promotion, according to a study by Pearl Analytics. Excluding news sites, the most prolific tweeters are solipsistic new-media marketing and tech mavens promoting themselves, another study by Sysomos suggests, according to Information Week blogger…

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IBM Scientists Build Computer Chips From DNA
PC World Aug. 16, 2009
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IBM scientists are researching ways in which DNA can self-assemble into patterns on a chip’s surface, acting as scaffolding for millions of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles that can serve as interconnects and transistors on future computer…

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Seeking
Slate Aug. 12, 2009
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The brain’s “seeking system” is hard-wired to obsessively love Google, Twitter, e-mail, and other electronic communication devices, fueled by the opioid
neurotransmitter dopamine, according to neuroscientists….

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RFID tags get an intelligence upgrade
NewScientist Tech Aug. 14, 2009
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Researchers are developing “computational RFID tags” (CRFIDs) with no external power source using microcontrollers and compact, energy-efficient software and ways to store data, making possible smarter applications (such as encrypting/decrypting data for more secure passports or credit cards and and moisture sensors)….

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Capping Two-faced ‘Janus’ Nanoparticle Gives Engineers Complete Control
ScienceDaily Aug. 11, 2009
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Duke University engineers have for the first time achieved optical and magnetic control over all the degrees of an nanoparticle’s motion, opening up broad possibilities for using “dot-Janus” particles as building blocks for applications such as electronic paper, self-propelling micromachines, assembly of nanostructures, and controlling the…

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Mobile phones get cyborg vision
BBC News Aug. 11, 2009
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Ubiquitous augmented reality (AR) is coming to some smart phones, providing rich, location-relevant information. For example, Acrossair’s iPhone app overlays tube-station information on the camera image, using data from the iPhone’s GPS and compass. And Mobilizy’s Wikitude world browser presents users of phones running Google’s Android with…

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‘Spiderbots’ talk amongst themselves inside active volcano
NewScientist Tech Aug. 11, 2009
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A squadron of robust, self-healing, remotely controllable “spiderbots” inside Mount St. Helens is the first network of volcano sensors that can automatically communicate with each other via a mesh network and with satellites, route data around any sensors that break, and be dropped into volcanoes. Similar networked robots could one day be used…

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Immortality improves cell reprogramming
Nature News Aug. 9, 2009
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Specialized adult cells made “immortal” through the blockade of an antitumor pathway (p53) can be turned into stem-like cells quickly and efficiently, making it easier to generate patient-specific cells from any tissue type, five research teams have found….

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Plasmodium Computing
the physics arXiv blog August 10, 2009
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A way to program a biological computer using the food-seeking behavior of the Physarum polycephalum (an amoeboid slide mold that can find the shortest way through mazes and anticipate periodic events), has been suggested by Andrew Adamatzky from University of the West of…

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Robots to get their own operating system
NewScientist Tech Aug. 10, 2009
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The Robot Operating System or ROS, an open-source set of programs meant to serve as a common platform for a wide range of robotics research, is being developed and used by teams at Stanford University, MIT, and the Technical University of Munich, among…

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Expert panel urges NASA to revive futuristic think tank
NewScientist Space Aug. 7, 2009
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NASA should revive its successful Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC), says an expert panel, focused on projects for 10 years and beyond….

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IBM gets $16 million to bolster its brain-on-a-chip technology
Networld World Aug. 8, 2009
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IBM has received $16.1 additional funding from DARPA to work on the Systems of neuromorphic adaptive plastic scalable electronics (SyNAPSE) program, bringing the total to $21 million. DARPA is looking to develop electronic neuromorphic machine technology that is scalable to biological levels. The goal is to develop systems capable of analyzing…

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Scaling Up a Quantum Computer
Technology Review August 7, 2009
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Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, CO, have demonstrated multiple computing operations on quantum bits–a crucial step toward building a practical quantum…

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Virtual Worlds May Be the Future Setting of Scientific Collaboration
PhysOrg.com Aug. 4, 2009
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The first professional scientific organization based entirely in virtual worlds, the Meta Institute for Computational Astrophysics (MICA), has been formed by scientists from the California Institute of Technology, Princeton, Drexel University, and MIT. In addition to getting people together in a free and convenient way, virtual worlds can…

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DNA computation gets logical
PhysOrg.com Aug. 3, 2009
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Weizmann Institute researchers have developed an advanced DNA computer capable of representing basic rules and facts and answering queries, using fluorescent molecules in some strands to light up in a combination of colors that represent…

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Researchers develop ‘brain-reading’ methods
PhysOrg.com July 27, 2009
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A highly accurate way to uncover a person’s mental state and what sort of information is being processed — before it reaches awareness — using functional MRI has been developed by Rutgers and UCLA scientists. The research also suggests that a more comprehensive approach is needed for mapping brain activity and that the widely held belief…

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Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man
New York Times July 25, 2009
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Impressed and alarmed by advances in artificial intelligence, a group of computer scientists is debating whether there should be limits on research that might lead to loss of human control over computer-based systems that carry a growing share of society’s…

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Terahertz Transistor Could Usher in Era of Cheap Surveillance Video Cameras
The physics arXiv blog July 20, 2009
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Nanoscale transistors are promising candidates for a new class of efficient terahertz detecting technology that could make “intimate” body-search-at-a-distance cameras as cheap and easy as conventional video…

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Ray Kurzweil and David Chalmers to Headline Singularity Summit 2009 inNew York
KurzweilAI.net July 15, 2009
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Singularity Summit 2009 moves to New York on October 3-4, the Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence (SIAI) plans to announce Thursday. The event will feature leading experts on accelerating technological change and the future of humanity, such as inventor/futurist Ray Kurzweil, speaking on “The Ubiquity and Predictability of the…

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The Next Hacking Frontier: Your Brain?
Wired Science July 9, 2009
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As neural devices such as deep brain stimulators and electrode systems for controlling prosthetic limbs become more complicated — and go wireless — some scientists say the risks of “brain hacking” should be taken…

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Computer learns sign language by watching TV
New Scientist Tech July 8, 2009
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Software developed in the UK has worked out the basics of sign language by absorbing TV shows that are both subtitled and…

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First Drug Shown to Extend Life Span in Mammals
Technology Review July 8, 2009
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Rapamycin, an antifungal drug derived from bacteria in the soil on Easter Island. can substantially extend the life span of mice, according to three independent…

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Singularity University Presents “Humanity’s Grandest Challenges”
KurzweilAI.net July 9, 2009
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Singularity University has invited the public to a panel discussion on “grand challenges” in water, health, the environment, and energy on Thursday, July 9 at 7pm PT at NASA Ames Research Park.

* Moderator: Mr. Vijay Vaitheeswaran, Writer for The Economist, Author of “Zoom”
* Global Public Health: Dr. Larry Brilliant, President, Skoll Urgest Threats Funds
* Climate: Dr. Chris Field, Carnegie/Stanford, U.S. Rep to the International Panel on Climate Change, co-author of the IPCC report that won the Nobel Prize with Al Gore
* Water: Ms. Meena Palaniappan, Pacific Institute, Director of their Water Initiative
* Climate: Dr. Bill Collins, Head of the Climate Science Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

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Quantum computer closer: Optical transistor made from single molecule
gizmag July 6, 2009
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An optical transistor has been created from a single hydrocarbon molecule called dibenzanthanthrene by ETH Zurich researchers….

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Memristor minds: The future of artificial intelligence
New Scientist Tech July 8, 2009
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Hybrid transitor-memristor chips designed to reproduce some of the brain’s thought processes have been developed by HP and Boston University researchers, and University of California, San Diego researchers have developed a memristive device that they claim behaves like a neural synapse….

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MIT develops camera-like fabric
CNET News July 7, 2009
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A fabric made of a mesh of light-sensitive fibers that collectively act like a rudimentary camera (without a lens) has been developed by MIT researchers. Within the fibers are two cylindrical shells of semiconductor material, each connected to the outside world with four built-in metal electrodes. MIT suggested that the technology, if…

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One step closer to an artificial nerve cell
PhysOrg.com July 6, 2009
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The first artificial nerve cell that can communicate with nerve cells in the body using neurotransmitters is being developed by Scientists at Karolinska
Institutet and Linkoping University. The scientists intend to develop a small unit that can be implanted into the body, and release neurotransmitters to treat individual patients. Research…

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Laser light switch could leave transistors in the shade
NewScientist Tech July 1, 2009
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An optical transistor that uses one laser beam to control another could form the heart of a future generation of ultrafast photonic computers, overcoming the speed limits with wires, say Swiss researchers. Using a green beam to switch an orange output beam from weak to strong is analogous to the way a transistor’s control electrode switches a…

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Can a new implant coating technique create a new six million dollar man?
PhysOrg.com June 29, 2009
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An electrochemical process for coating metal implants to make them resemble biological material vastly improves their functionality, longevity and integration into the body a Tel Aviv University researcher has…

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Review: Wetware by Dennis Bray
New Scientist Opinion June 30, 2009
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Living cells are chemical computers. (Volker Steger/Christian Barpelle/SPL) They take information from the environment and process it to produce behavioral “outputs.” The processing units are proteins, which perform all the same operations as the logic gates of a computer. Inputs from the environment cause the proteins to flip shape, to…

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Scientists create first quantum processor
PhysOrg.com June 26, 2009
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A team led by Yale University researchers has created the first rudimentary two-qubit solid-state quantum processor, taking another step toward building a quantum…

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Physics brings realism to virtual reality
NewScientist Tech June 28, 2009
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The latest multi-core processors and some smart software allow techniques used by physicists and engineers to simulate the real world in extreme detail, creating virtual worlds governed by real physics, rather than the simplified versions used today. One expert evens predicts that such techniques could
be used to create Matrix-like virtual…

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Domestic robots with a taste for flesh
New Scientist Tech June 25, 2009
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Five domestic robots that gain energy by eating flies and mice, digested by an internal microbial fuel cell, have been built by James Auger, at the Royal College of Art, London and collaborator….

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Teenage ‘baby’ may lack master aging gene
New Scientist Health June 25, 2009
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Brooke Greenberg is 16 years old now (the picture shows her at age 11), but hasn’t aged since she was an infant. Understanding her condition could provide an insight into the genetics of aging. Richard Walker of the University of South Florida College of Medicine thinks that Brooke is the first recorded
case of what he describes as…

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Human Eye Inspires Advance In Computer Vision
ScienceDaily June 22, 2009
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Inspired by the behavior of the human eye, Boston College computer scientists have developed a technique that lets computers see objects as fleeting as a butterfly with nearly double the accuracy and 10 times the speed of earlier…

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The AI Report
Forbes June 22, 2009
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Humanoid robots, passing the Turing test, unsupervised learning, and AI’s used to fight terrorism and a few of the topics in AI, robotics, and intelligence covered in this special section written by 22 experts….

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Cell Phones That Listen and Learn
Technology Review June 22, 2009
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SoundSense, which picks up sounds and tries to classify them into “voice,” “music,” or “ambient noise” categories, is a step in building a system that can learn user behavior on the go, say its Dartmouth College developers. The software could allow for giving users feedback on their daily activities for health, time-management, and…

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Plan to teach military robots the rules of war
New Scientist Tech June 18, 2009
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An “ethical governor” that aims to ensure that robot attack aircraft behave ethically in combat has been developed by robotics engineer Ron Arkin at the Georgia Institute of…

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Semantic technology takes off
KurzweilAI.net June 18, 2009
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Key news at the Semantic Technology Conference in San Jose: Wolfram Alpha rep Russel Foltz Smith said they will offer an API to their engine that will allow companies with natural-language front ends to call their engine and get rich data from across the web. Ask.com announced they are crawling the web
gathering Q&A pairs and parsing…

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Re-Engineering the Earth
The Atlantic July/August 2009
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A few scientists are considering radical — and possibly extremely dangerous — schemes for reengineering the climate by brute force. Their ideas are
technologically plausible and cheap, so a rich and committed environmentalist could act on them tomorrow. And the scariest part….

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The Display That Watches You
Technology Review June 5, 2009
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Researchers at Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems (IPMS) have developed a screen technology that could help make wearable displays more compact and simpler to use. By interlacing photodetector cells with display pixels, the researchers have built a system that can display a moving image while also detecting movement directly in front…

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Inside the Military’s Secret Terror-Tagging Tech
Wired Danger Room June 3, 2009
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The military has spent hundreds of millions of dollars researching, developing, and purchasing “Tagging tracking and locating” (TTL) devices, including laser-based reflectors, RFID tags capable of responding from twelve miles away, homing beacons so tiny, they can be woven into fabric or paper, and invisible chemical dye to mark…

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US shells out $10M for unmanned aircraft that can perch like a bird
Network World Layer 8 June 3, 2009
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AeroVironment has received n additional $5.4 million from DARPA to further develop a tiny aircraft that can fly into tight spaces undetected, perch, and send live surveillance information to its…

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Reading the Surface of the Brain
Technology Review June 3, 2009
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Neurolutions is developing a small implanted device that translates signals recorded from the surface of the brain into computer commands to allow paralyzed patients to control a computer and perhaps prosthetic limbs and other devices. (Eric Leuthardt, Washington University School of Medicine) The device is based on electrocorticography…

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Sony latest to demo videogame motion-sensing controller
PhysOrg.com June 3, 2009
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Sony on Tuesday demonstrated a prototype motion-sensing videogame controller. A camera tracks the player’s movements, and software translates their movements to those of onscreen characters….

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Commonly used medications may produce cognitive impairment in older adults
PhysOrg.com June 1, 2009
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Many drugs such as sleeping pills commonly prescribed to older adults for a variety of common medical conditions including allergies, hypertension, asthma, and cardiovascular disease appear to negatively affect the aging brain. The drugs cause immediate but possibly reversible cognitive impairment, including delirium, in older adults, according…

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How to Build a 100-Million-Image Database
The physics arXiv blog Jun 1, 2009
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A database of 100 million high-quality digital images taken from Flickr by Institute of Information Science and Technologies in Pisa, Italy could help in testing the next generation of image search algorithms….

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Xbox 360 Project Natal: Full-Body Motion Control One-Ups the Wii
Gizmodo Jun 1, 2009
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Microsoft’s Project Natal, a bar that sits above or below your TV, lets you control games just by moving around, using a camera, sensors and a microphone. It lets you move through menus by swiping your hands back and forth. The camera allows for facial and voice recognition and will recognize your face and sign you in automatically. It…

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Siri lifts veil on intelligent assistant
Mercury News May 27, 2009
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Siri, a San Jose company, has announced that it would offer an “intelligent agent” for the iPhone that responds to natural-language queries to find movie theaters, book restaurant reservations and airline flights, buy from online retail sites, and even answer trivia questions….

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Superconducting Chips To Become Reality
Science Daily May 29, 2009
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Superconducting germanium doped by gallium has been produced by scientists at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD) research center. Germanium as a new material for chips would enable both faster processes and further miniaturization in micro- and nanoelectronics….

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Despite ‘Terminator,’ machines still on our side: Scientists say AI will be humanity’s ‘Salvation’
Daily News May 26, 2009
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AI experts including Reid Simmons of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and Ray Kurzweil say the post-apocalyptic “Terminator Salvation” scenario is unlikely. “Kurzweil believes the technical advancement of the next few decades will herald a literal rewiring of the human brain. Given
the shrinking costs of nanotechnology,…

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Is A Terminator Scenario Possible?
H+ May 21, 2009
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H+ asked David Brin, Ben Goertzel, J. Storrs Hall, Vernor Vinge, and others: “Is a Terminator-like scenario possible? And if so, how likely is…

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Harnessing science to create the ultimate warrior
New Scientist Science in Society May 20, 2009
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Super-soldiers could be selected for specific duties on the basis of their genetic makeup and then constantly monitored for signs of weakness, says a report by the US National Academies of Science. If a soldier is struggling, a digital “buddy” might step in and warn them about nearby threats, or advise
comrades to zap them with an electromagnet…

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Modeling Sneaky Robots
Technology Review May 20, 2009
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An algorithm that models stealthy robot behavior has been developed by . Seoul National University professors. They designed simulations in which a robot waits in the shadows and moves quickly between obstacles to intercept a target….

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I.B.M. Unveils Real-Time Software to Find Trends in Vast Data Sets
New York Times May 20, 2009
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System S, new software from IBM, can acquire huge volumes of data from many sources and quickly identify correlations within it, harnessing advances in computing and networking horsepower in a fashion that analysts and customers describe as unprecedented. Instead of creating separate large databases to track things like currency movements,…

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New memory material may hold data for one billion years
Nanowerk News May 20, 2009
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A new experimental computer memory device that can store 1 terabyte per square inch (allowing for storing thousands of times more data than conventional silicon chips) with an estimated lifetime of more than one billion years has been developed by Alex Zettl of UC Berkeley and colleagues. The device consists of an iron nanoparticle enclosed in…

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Dutch Supercomputer Establishes New Record in Go
HPC Wire May 15, 2009
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The Go program MoGo TITAN, running on the Dutch national supercomputer Huygens, defeated two human Go professionals at the Taiwan Open 2009, held in Taiwan Feb. 10-13. After the victory of IBM’s Deep Blue against Garry Kasparov, the game of Go — one of the last board games where humans are still able to easily win against AI — has replaced…

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Inside the bad-ass world of military research projects
Network World Layer 8 May 18, 2009
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The US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has detailed nine top strategic research programs in a 57-page report, including supercomputers,
self-forming/self-defending networks, quantum information science, and real-time accurate language translation….

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Nine games computers are ruining for humanity
New Scientist Science in Society May 18, 2009
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AI researchers have taught computers to play a wide range of strategic games well enough to beat the best human players, including chess, poker, and checkers. The next generation of bots will be general game players (GGPs), which can learn the rules of any game and then figure out how to play…

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Will designer brains divide humanity?
New Scientist Science in Society May 13, 2009
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It will soon be possible to boost human brainpower with electronic “plug-ins” or even by genetic enhancement. What will this mean for the future of humanity? Would it widen the gulf between the world’s haves and have-nots — and perhaps even lead to a distinct and dominant species with unmatchable powers of intellect? It won’t be long before…

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Darpa: Heat + Energy = Brains. Now Make Us Some.
Wired Danger Room May 8, 2009
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Darpa’s latest venture, called “Physical Intelligence” (PI) intends to prove mathematically that all brain activities — reasoning, emoting, processing sights and smells — derive from physical mechanisms, acting according to the
principles of “thermodynamics in open systems.” They’re asking for “abiotic, self-organizing electronic and chemical…

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Brain scanning may be used in security checks
The Guardian May 10, 2009
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Distinctive brain patterns could become the latest subject of biometric scanning after EU researchers successfully tested technology to verify
­identities for security checks. The U.S. government’s IARPA (Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity) is seeking development proposals to enhance such biometric-signature…

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Could the net become self-aware?
New Scientist Tech April 30, 2009
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“The Internet behaves a fair bit like a mind,” says Ben Goertzel, chair of the Artificial General Intelligence Research Institute. “It might already have a degree of consciousness…. The outlook for humanity is probably better in the
case that an emergent, coherent and purposeful Internet mind develops.” If the effort that has gone into…

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Ugolog Creates Surveillance Website
To Watch Anyone, Anywhere
Singularity Hub April 28, 2009
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Ugolog allows individuals to quickly set up a powerful surveillance system (for home monitoring, for example), using live video streaming via the Ugolog website, but the service could raise privacy issues for some uses….

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Face Mining: Finding Who and When in Video
KurzweilAI.net April 27, 2009
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Pittsburgh Pattern Recognition, a start-up spun out from Carnegie Mellon University, has posted a face mining concept for the TV series Star Trek that allows for navigating video by character. “We applied our state-of-the art algorithms in face detection, face tracking and face recognition to 67 Star Trek episodes over three seasons. This…

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Computer Program to Take On ‘Jeopardy!’
New York Times April 26, 2009
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IBM plans to announce Monday that it is in the final stages of completing a computer program named Watson to compete against human “Jeopardy!” contestants, using a Blue Gene supercomputer and a database with a significant fraction of the Web now indexed by Google. If the program — a new class of software that can “understand” human questions…

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Singularity 101 with Vernor Vinge
H+ April 24, 2009
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Signs that the Singularity is near might include “larger and larger software debacles” and “whether or not the effects of Moore’s Law are continuing on track,” suggests legendary science- fiction writer Vernor Vinge….

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Brain Wave of The Future
Washington Post April 23, 2009
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NeuroSky is turning brain-computer interfaces into cheap, ubiquitous consumer items, including Christmas competitors like Mattel’s $80 Mindflex and Uncle Milton’s $130 Force Trainer, both of which involve levitating a ping-pong-like ball. NeuroSky plans to develop brain-wave sensors for the automotive, health-care and education industries….

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Innovation: Harnessing spammers to advance AI
NewScientist.Tech April 17, 2009
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If spammers are able to write a program to read distorted text (and images) in CAPTCHAs (scrambled letters that attempt to block spammers), they have solved an AI problem,” says their creator Luis von Ahn of Carnegie Mellon
University….

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Neuroscientists propose project to comprehensively map mammalian brain circuits
PhysOrg.com Mar. 31, 2009
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A first-draft circuit map of the entire mouse brain within two to three years has been proposed by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and 20 other major research institutions as a first step in assembling a comprehensive map of the major neural circuits in the mammalian brain. The whole-brain circuit map
should provide insights about what goes wrong…

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Researchers bring new brain mapping capabilities to desktops of scientists worldwide
PhysOrg Mar. 31, 2009
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Research teams at the University of Utah and University of Colorado at Boulder have made technical advances that have significantly reduced the time it takes to map brain regions. These include automation tools to tag every cell with a molecular signature, capture 25,000 TEM images weekly, and automatically merge thousands of images into…

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Humanoid robot helps scientists to understand intelligence
PhysOrg.com Mar. 31, 2009
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Imperial College London researchers believe their iCub humanoid robot will help them learn more about how humans use cognition to interact with their world. The team will link a computer simulation of a human brain to iCub so that it can process information about its environment and activate its motors to allow it to move its arms, head, eyes…

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Google announces Cognitive Autoheuristic Distributed-Intelligence Entity
KurzweilAI.net April 1, 2009
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Google announced at midnight the world’s first Cognitive Autoheuristic
Distributed-Intelligence Entity (CADIE), the first evolving intelligent system. “im a girl, 2 minutes old, just hanging out in da C.A. learnin a lot tryin 2 get
smarter make friends save humanity etc etc. i like cmputrs (duh) sunsets rainbows ponies and after 1 netwide…

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New robot ‘steered by human thought’: Honda
PhysOrg.com Mar. 31, 2009
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Honda’s latest ASIMO robot version can be steered by human thought, using a helmet-like brain machine interface to perform four basic movements with its arms, legs and tongue….

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Alarm raised about religion defamation ban
AP Mar. 29, 2009
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The U.N.’s top human rights body has approved a “defamation of religion” proposal by Muslim nations urging the passage of laws protecting religion from criticism. Christian, Jewish, and secular groups say the non-binding
resolution restricts freedom of speech and will worsen relations between…

IIB’s Note: This could be used to protect “secular” Transhumanism from criticism as well. A bad move on all levels.

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How Can You Tell If Your IM Buddy Is Really a Machine?
Discover Mar. 23, 2009
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One of the quickest and easiest ways to sniff out a bot is to test a chatter’s medium-term memory, suggests computer scientist Kevin Warwick. While a human will likely remember that you asked, “What color is an apple?” three minutes ago, a bot may not, so asking the same question a second time will produce an identical answer. The reverse can…

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Vast Spy System Loots Computers in 103 Countries
New York Times Mar. 28, 2009
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A vast electronic spying operation has infiltrated computers and has stolen documents from hundreds of government and private offices around the world, University of Toronto researchers have found….

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Brain on a chip?
PhysOrg.com Mar. 16, 2009
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European researchers are building a neuromorphic computer that will work similar to the brain, at smaller scale. The first effort is a network of 300 artificial neurons and half a million “synapses” on a single chip….

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Brain scan reveals memories of where you’ve been
New Scientist Health Mar. 12, 2009
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Functional MRI scans of the hippocampus (responsible for memory) have for the first time been used to detect a person’s location in a virtual environment. The finding suggests that more detailed mind-reading, such as detecting as
memories of a summer holiday, might eventually be possible, says Eleanor Maguire, a neuroscientist at University…

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DHS wants to use human body odor as biometric identifier, clue to deception
UPI Mar. 9, 2009
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The U.S. Department of Homeland Security plans to study the possibility that human body odor could be used to tell when people are lying or to identify individuals in the same way that fingerprints…

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Researchers find ways to sniff keystrokes from thin air
IT World Mar. 12, 2009
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The electromagnetic radiation that is generated every time a computer keyboard is tapped is easy to capture and decode, two separate research teams, from the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne and security consultancy Inverse Path, have found….

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Wireless Tasers extend the long arm of the law
New Scientist Tech Mar. 11, 2009
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The new Taser XREP is an electrically charged dart that can be fired from up to 20 meters away with a 12-gauge shotgun. Upon impact, its barbed electrodes penetrate a victim’s skin, discharging a 20-second burst of
electricity to “distract, disorient and entice the subject to grab the projectile,” which routes the shock through the hand,…

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Lockheed offers ready-to-go supersoldier exoskeleton
The Register Feb. 27, 2009
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Lockheed’s Human Universal Load Carrier exoskeleton will allow soldiers to carry loads up to 200 pounds with minimal…

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Inexpensive scanners can ‘fingerprint’ paper, researchers say
Network World Mar. 10, 2009
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Researchers at Princeton University and University College London say they can identify unique information, essentially like a fingerprint, from any sheet of paper using any reasonably good scanner. The technique could be used to crack down on counterfeiting or even keep track of confidential…

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Unveiling the “Sixth Sense,” game-changing wearable tech
KurzweilAI.net Mar. 11, 2009
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TED has just released the video of MIT scientists Pattie Maes & Pranav Mistry unveiling their “Sixth Sense,” a wearable device with a projector, as in Minority Report — the buzz of…

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High time to act on armed robots
New Scientist Science in Society Mar. 10, 2009
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Robot sentries patrol the borders of South Korea and Israel. Remote-controlled aircraft mount missile attacks on enemy positions. Other military robots are already in service, and not just for defusing bombs or detecting landmines. MAARS robot (Qinetiq) A coming generation of autonomous combat robots capable of deep penetration into enemy…

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The Next Generation in Human Computer Interfaces – Awesome Videos
Singularity Hub Mar. 4, 2009
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A new generation of exciting new interfaces with the digital world is in the pipeline, including Siftables (computerized blocks you can stack and shuffle in your hands), Reactables (new way of creating and interacting with music), and mixed-reality interfaces….

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Wolfram Alpha Computes Answers To Factual Questions. This Is Going To Be Big.
TechCrunch Mar. 8, 2009
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Stephen Wolfram’s forthcoming Wolfram Alpha online service, a “computational knowledge engine,” will compute answers to factual questions, using models of fields of knowledge, complete with data and algorithms, with a natural-language interface. The project involves more than a hundred people working in stealth to create a vast system of…

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The first virtual reality technology to let you see, hear, smell, taste and touch
PhysOrg Mar. 4, 2009
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U.K. scientists are creating the “Virtual Cocoon,” a new “Real Virtuality” (all senses stimulated to create a fully immersive perceptual experience) device that can stimulate all five senses much more realistically than any other current or prospective device. Concept design of a mobile Virtual Cocoon…

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EFF launches surveillance self-defense site
KurzweilAI.net Mar. 5, 2009
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The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has created a Surveillance Self-Defense site to educate the American public about the law and technology of U.S. government surveillance and provide technical information on how to protect your privacy….

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Shocking cancer treatment may also yield weapon
New Scientist Tech Mar. 5, 2009
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A technique using 60-nanosecond pulses thought to be a promising cancer treatment is also being investigated by Old Dominion University as the basis for a Taser-like weapon that stuns for longer….

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Robotic computer watches your every move
New Scientist Tech Mar. 2, 2009
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Giving a PC a robotic neck and throwing away the keyboard and mouse has produced a less-demanding personal computer controlled only by gestures….

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Microsoft Mapping Course to a Jetsons-Style Future
New York Times Mar. 1, 2009
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Microsoft is developing advanced artificial intelligence and graphics systems, such as a virtual assistant with voice- and facial-recognition skills who can book appointments for meetings or schedule a flight. The new system will take advantage of computing systems that Microsoft says will be about 50 to 100 times more powerful than today’s…

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Designer Babies – Like It Or Not, Here They Come
Singularity Hub Feb. 25, 2009
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The era of designer babies is here and there is no going back. Case in point: the Fertility Institute will soon be able to offer couples the ability to screen their embryos for eye color, hair color, and complexion. It also plans to offer
almost any conceivable customization as science makes them available. Opponents are vilifying the…

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Microsoft Demos Augmented Vision
Technology Review Feb. 24, 2009
*************************
Microsoft researchers have demonstrated software that can superimpose computer-generated information in real time on top of a digitized view of the real world, which could add another dimension to future smart…

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Oak Ridge explores cybots
Government Computer News Feb. 19, 2009
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An army of software robots intelligent enough to cooperate with one another to monitor and defend the largest networks against security threats: that’s the goal of the Ubiquitous Network Transient Autonomous Mission Entities (UNTAME) program that researchers are developing at Oak Ridge National…

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Reading Thoughts with Brain Imaging
Technology Review Feb. 18, 2009
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Vanderbilt University researchers have reported that from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from visual areas of the brain alone, they could distinguish which of two images subjects were holding in their memory — even several seconds after the images were removed. The study also pinpointed, for the first time, where in the…

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The Cellphone, Navigating Our Lives
New York Times Feb. 16, 2009
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With the dominance of the cellphone, the map is emerging as a new metaphor for how we organize, find and use information. A new generation of smartphones like Google’s Android G1 and a range of Japanese phones now “augment” reality by painting a map over a phone-screen image of the user’s
surroundings produced by the phone’s camera. With…

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Scientists read minds with infrared scan
PhysOrg.com Feb. 10, 2009
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Researchers at Canada’s largest children’s rehabilitation hospital have developed a technique that uses infrared light brain imaging to decode preference — with the goal of ultimately opening the world of choice to children who can’t speak or…

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Google Taking a Step Into Power Metering
New York Times Feb. 9, 2009
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Google will announce its entry Tuesday into the small but growing business of the “smart grid,” digital technologies that seek to keep the electrical system on an even keel and reduce electrical energy consumption. Google has developed a free Web service called PowerMeter that consumers can use to track energy use in their house or business as…

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Video: Robot uses human mind tricks to navigate
New Scientist Tech Feb. 8, 2009
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Engineers in Germany have been studying human brain activity related to visual information to improve the way moving robots avoid obstacles….

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How to control a herd of humans

New Scientist Science in Society Feb. 4, 2009
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Stanford University researchers have found that activities performed
in unison, such as marching or dancing, increase loyalty to the group. This helps explain why fascist leaders, amongst others, use organised marching and chanting to whip crowds into a frenzy of devotion to their cause, according to psychologist Jonathan Haidt at the…

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Innovation: Speech prediction software
NewScientist.Tech Feb. 3, 2009
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National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) of Japan claims that its “speech completion” technology is a first. The software could make speech-recognition software more powerful by increasing the speed and accuracy with which you can dictate long and difficult words and common…

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Singularity University to Study Accelerating Technologies, Launches at NASA Ames
KurzweilAI.net Feb. 3, 2009
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With the support of NASA, Google and a broad range of technology thought leaders and entrepreneurs, a new university will launch in Silicon Valley this summer with the goal of preparing the next generation of leaders to address “humanity’s grand challenges.” Singularity University (SU) (www.singularityu.org) will open its doors in June 2009 on…

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Google Ocean adds detail to the depths
New Scientist Tech Feb. 2, 2009
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Google Earth can now provide a detailed 3D view of features both above and below water, relying on the U.S. Navy for sonar and other data….

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When you watch these ads, the ads check you out
AP Jan. 30, 2009
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Small cameras can now be embedded in a public video screen or hidden around it, tracking who looks at the screen and for how long, reminiscent of the science-fiction movie “Minority Report.” TruMedia Technologies, the makers of the tracking systems, say the software can determine the viewer’s gender, approximate age range and, in some cases,…

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Ethics Report on Autonomous Military Robots to be Released
KurzweilAI.net Feb. 2, 2009
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The Ethics + Emerging Technologies Group at Cal Poly will release a major report, “Autonomous Military Robots: Risk, Ethics, and Design,” Monday, authored by several of its faculty researchers and funded by the US Department of Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR). The 100+ page preliminary report addresses current and predicted states of…

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Working Artificial Nerve Networks Under Development
Science Daily Jan. 30, 2009
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Weizmann Institute of Science researchers have created circuits and logic gates made of live nerves grown in the lab. The objective is to create a synthetic, many-neuron “thinking”…

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Future Watch: A.I. comes of age
Computerworld Jan. 26, 2009
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The Stanford Artificial Intelligence Robot (Stair) represents a new wave of AI, one that integrates learning, vision, navigation, manipulation, planning,
reasoning, speech and natural-language processing. It also marks a transition of AI from narrow, carefully defined domains to real-world situations in which systems learn to deal with complex…

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Light-speed nanotech: Controlling the nature of graphene
PhysOrg.com Jan. 21, 2009
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Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have discovered a new method for controlling the nature of graphene, bringing academia and industry potentially one step closer to realizing the mass production of graphene-based…

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Semiconducting Nanotubes Are ‘Holy Grail’ for Electronic Applications
PhysOrg.com Jan. 21, 2009
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Duke University chemists have created exclusively semiconducting versions of single-walled carbon nanotubes for use in manufacturing reliable electronic nanocircuits. In addition to being tiny, these nanotubes offer reduced heat output and operation a higher frequencies, compared to current materials used to make miniaturized electronic…

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Basking in Big Data
Technology Review Jan. 16, 2009
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Researchers at the University of California, Davis, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced that they have developed software that makes analysis and visualization of huge data sets possible without the aid of a…

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AI-based virtual agent for call centers lowers costs, improves caller experience
KurzweilAI.net Jan. 12, 2009
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Adaptive A.I. Inc. (a2i2) of Playa del Rey, CA plans to announce on Monday the “world’s first commercial AGI (artificial general intelligence) system” — a virtual IVR (interactive voice response) call center operator that can hold “smart, productive conversations,” CEO Peter Voss, a computer scientist and entrepreneur, told KurzweilAI.net in an…

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New games powered by brain waves
PhysOrg.com Jan. 10, 2009
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The Mind Flex game from toy maker Mattel allows players to move a ball around an obstacle course by directing their thoughts, and toymaker Uncle Milton’s “Force Trainer” (named after Yoda’s “The Force”) similarly allows players to lift a ball inside a transparent tube….

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How the city hurts your brain
Boston.com Jan. 2, 2009
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Just being in an urban environment impairs our basic mental processes. After spending a few minutes on a crowded city street, the brain is less able to hold things in memory, and suffers from reduced self-control, University of Michigan scientists have found….

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Coming to the Battlefield: Stone-Cold Robot Killers
Washington Post Jan. 4, 2009
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Armed robotic aircraft soar in the skies above Pakistan, hurling death down on America’s enemies in the war on terrorism. Soon — years, not decades, from now — American armed robots will patrol on the ground as well, fundamentally transforming the face of battle. The Army stands on the threshold of one of the greatest transformations in…

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Researchers create all seeing ‘eye’
PhysOrg.com Jan. 5, 2009
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Scientists at The Vision Center in Australia say the Perspex globe, designed primarily as a scientific tool to investigate how insects see, navigate and learn, also has potential uses for guiding robot vehicles and aircraft, providing low-cost panoramic security surveillance and novel lighting…


Co-founded by noted futurist Ray Kurzweil and X Prize CEO and chairman Peter Diamandis, Singularity University will begin offering a 10-week interdisciplinary course in exponentially growing technologies this summer.

Starting this summer, some of the world’s leading thinkers in exponentially growing technologies will be gathering annually at NASA Ames Research Center, in the heart of Silicon Valley, for 10 weeks of discussions on how to change the future. And you could join them.

The gatherings will be part of what is known as Singularity University, a brand-new academic institution co-founded by inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil, X Prize chairman and CEO Peter Diamandis, and former Yahoo Brickhouse head Salim Ismail, and anyone can apply.

Singularity University is less a traditional university and more an institution that will feature intensive 10-week, 10-day, or 3-day programs examining a set of 10 technologies and disciplines, such as future studies and forecasting; biotechnology and bioinformatics; nanotechnology; AI, robotics, and cognitive computing; and finance and entrepreneurship.

The founders anticipate that students will come from all over the world, and they hope the program results in the founding of new companies, the evolution of scientific and technological thinking, and the solidifying of professional and personal networks among the highly-accomplished students and faculty.

To Kurzweil, Singularity University is a place to problem-solve and talk about the results of the most recent iterations of the exponentially growing technologies that have shaped modern life. Among them, he said, are vacuum tubes, integrated circuits, chips and microprocessors.

Now, he said, we are on the threshold of an explosion of the newest such technology, including 3D and self-organizing molecular circuits. And to Kurzweil, the ability to bring together the leaders in this wide range of fields is a rare opportunity to jump-start the future. (The program’s name is based on the theories Kurzweil popularized in his best-selling book The Singularity is Near.)

For Diamandis, who previously co-founded the International Space University (a space studies program on which Singularity University will be modeled), the idea of building an interdisciplinary academic institution around the concepts of exponentially growing trends seemed natural–and powerful.

So, after bringing together 50 leading thinkers for a founding conference at NASA Ames, Kurzweil, Diamandis, and Ismail got the backing of Ames’ director, Pete Worden, and a commitment of space at the center–a highly visual Silicon Valley landmark along highway 101–for the annual summer programs.

In addition to the core 10-week course, which will be open to graduate and post-graduate students, Singularity University will also offer 3-day and 10-day executive programs. The shorter version will be targeted at CEOs and CTOs, while the 10-day program will be aimed at rising-star executives who want to add to their knowledge and networks.

“These programs are there to give executives a look at what’s in the lab today,” said Diamandis, “and what is likely to hit the marketplace in the next 5 to 10 years.”

This summer, Singularity University will kick off with just 30 or so students and will piggyback on the International Space University, which will host 120 students at NASA Ames. But in following years, the new institution is expected to expand to about 120 students, each of whom could be the next Larry Page or Sergey Brin.

“If we do our job correctly,” Diamandis said, students “will meet, (discover their) common visions, and start companies together. They’ll have a chance to match a nanotech expert from Russia with an AI expert from Silicon Valley and see what magic happens at the boundaries.”

A stellar faculty
As evidence of how seriously many people in the fields of focus take Singularity University, it has pulled together what can only be described as a very impressive roster of faculty.

Among them are The Sims and Spore creator Will Wright; George Smoot, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley and winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics; Dan Kammen, co-director of the Berkeley Institute of the Environment and a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change team that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore; Vint Cerf, Google’s chief Internet evangelist; and Stephanie Langhoff, NASA Ames’ chief scientist.

Befitting the serious nature of the program, its curriculum is not for the faint of heart. The first phase, said Diamandis, is a series of plenary lectures in which all students take the same coursework and learn together about each of the 10 disciplines.

“It’s about learning the vocabulary” of the disciplines, Diamandis said, “the basic principles, so they can communicate better between themselves.”

In the second phase, students will take deep dives into one of the 10 tracks, typically not one in which they already specialize, learning together in 10-person classes.

And in the final phase, the entire student body will come together to work on a team project.

“This is where the student body will focus as a group in taking on one of the world’s grand challenges,” said Diamandis, dealing “with global hunger, pandemics, climate change,” or something similar.

And while the program’s students can expect to work very hard and be deeply immersed in their studies, the faculty will be equally challenged.

“It caused all of us who were invited to be faculty to pause and think about it,” said Paul Saffo, a Silicon Valley-based forecaster who is teaching in the Singularity University program. “We’re expected to be there for the full nine weeks, which is a breathtaking commitment of time.”

But for Saffo, who is helping to organize the future studies and forecasting track with Kurzweil, being intimately involved with the program at every level is precisely the point.

“The real benefit of teaching is being able to participate,” Saffo said. “It would be a waste of time to just show up, give a couple of lectures, and leave.”

And while their involvement at any level would bring Singularity University the prestige it needs to recruit talented students and faculty, both Kurzweil and Diamandis said they would be teaching each summer.

For Kurzweil, that means teaching some of the future studies and forecasting classes, and for Diamandis, it means helping to build the curriculum and teaching where he is needed.

The students, meanwhile, will need to pony up some serious money to take part in Singularity University. The base fee for the 10-week program is $25,000, though Diamandis said that there will be a significant number of full and partial scholarships available, funded by private companies, and other contributors.

Ultimately, the results of Singularity University won’t be known for some time. But given the people behind it and the likelihood of a steady stream of highly talented students, the odds of it producing the kind of deep thinking and world-changing technology the founders hope for are good.

“I have no doubt that society gets ever more complex, and the consequences of ever-growing technology become ever more difficult to anticipate and respond to,” said Saffo. “So having a 10-week program of smart, committed people looking at the challenges from an interdisciplinary point of view can only be a good thing.”

http://singularityu.org/about/

http://singularityu.org/about/partners/

Updates:
*We taught Google’s new advanced speech recognition how to hear.
*Obama’s NBIC (nano-bio-info-cogno convergence) Agenda.

-Obama appoints Google CEO as economic adviser.

-Google Founders’ Fighter Jet Will Fly NASA Missions.

*Google funding Artificial General Intelligence research via Novamente.
Google Adds Searching by Voice to iPhone Software – New York Times

Ignorance Is Futile:

The vision of Google’s future, according to Google co-founder, Sergey Brin, is “it would be like the mind of God”. And it’s a future that they’re working feverishly to make a reality today.

While that quote was in reference to “the ultimate search engine”, this analysis is going to make it more than clear that he was in fact referring to Google in particular. In doing so, we’ll see numerous other quotes demonstrating their intentions, what they mean by “all of the worlds information”, how they’re on precisely the right path to achieve their goal with the U.S. military in this vast project that is set to change humanity forever.


Trailer for my upcoming film “an unholy alliance”.

“AI” is actually too “narrow” of a term for a cognitive system, but a “broad” cognitive system would contain many narrow AI parts. To even contemplate the notion of cognitive “Artificial General Intelligence” one must first embrace emergence. Emergence is the key to all complex systems that could be considered in attempting to create a model for an AGI system. Google’s methodology in their quest is to exploit and harness the powers of emergence, while adding ‘parts’ that perform cognitive tasks in their own right. The idea is to push the term superorganism to the fullest potential. The insights are the ant colony, and the beehive. The models are the Internet, and the human brain. The entire premise of emergence is ‘the sum is greater than its parts’.

Ants are abysmally stupid, in our terms, yet the colony as a superorganism often gives rise to give the impression of the individual ants being intelligent. With beehives this feature expands even further. Under the right conditions, a complex systems analysis of the collective can be indistinguishable from that as a single organism. Compare to cells in the human body, or brain alone. Each human mind is a hive, of neurons; a hivemind. Each neuron is abysmally stupid, and each brain part is nearly worthless alone, yet the interconnected cells of each part and each part interconnected give rise to consciousness and higher brain functions.

Then there’s the Internet, with its millions of routers and billions of computers all interconnected as one that is already evolving into a ‘smart’ semantic web on its own. It’s no wonder that philosophers often compare the Internet -as a complex system- to the brain, and many thinkers argue that at some point the Internet itself may become unintendedly conscious via emergence. But what if a collective of intelligent beings harnessing global scale supercomputers armed with state of the art algorithms made the goal of turning their symbiotic co-evolving component of the Internet their life’s work?

Enter Google: Google seeks to “gather & organize”, in their words, “all of the worlds information“. It’s the company slogan, and when you hear them speak it they place much emphasis on “all”. But what’s more, according to both co-founders of the company, they intend for it to “understand” what all of the worlds information means. In many cases, they’re going to extremes in order to “gather all” of it, but they’re lettings us do the work for them wherever they can. A look over their “Product” list is as far as one must go to get an idea, yet it goes further than that. But first, the main search feature must be highlighted.

Google, like other search engines, “crawls” the Internet. That is, their algorithm laden interconnected supercomputer automatons scour the Internet, link-by-link literally archiving the entire history of the Internet, page by page, day by day. A page changes and Google finds the change and adds it to its own archives. It then saves these archives for all time. This includes content from social networks, blogs, news sites, and so forth. Feeding a link into Archive.org’s Wayback Machine paints a candid picture of this process. Their urgency to archive all possible acquirable data also extends to other areas, such as your personal life via Gmail, Health, Calendar & Google Desktop (which scans all of the files in your “personal” computer) .

Another technique is the ‘transfer of human intelligence‘, which involves monitoring our behavior as we surf the Web and more. This is achieved via many routes, such as the standard Google Search, Google cookies, Google Toolbar (that embeds in most web browser programs), Google Desktop, sites with AdSense integrated, “Powered by Google” complete site integration, and last-but-not-least their new Google Chrome web-browser. Add to that Docs and  Knol.

There isn’t even room in this article to explain the ramifications that each one of their “Products” poses in what it’s set to “understand” about yourself & your habits, and everything about the human race from the genetic to the social scale. But note their new “Android” mobile device service, which has 2 alarming features. First, is one app that records the users iris scan, for login purposes. Second, nearly every other app encourages the use of real-time navigational GPS tracking. So on one hand it conditions you to submit your eye iris scans, and on the other it conditions you to embrace constant real-time GPS tracking of your every move. The latter is dually striking as virtually all modern cell phones already embody GPS tracking, except most people aren’t yet aware of that.

In other cases they go out of their way to acquire ‘their’ data: Google Books, Patent Search, Scholar, Maps & Street View, Earth, Translate, Finance and now even Newspaper (archiving the history of all possible print newspapers). For some insight into the implications of their machine eventually having in its ‘intellectual possession’ virtually the entire history of humanity’s books, newspaper, scholarly academic papers and so forth, consider the statement from a Google Factory Tour guide: “We are not scanning all those books to be read by people, we are scanning them to be read by an AI.” The point is proven in the fact that they’re scanning the entire books whether or not the entire contents will be browsable online. Perhaps my publishing of this article online is giving the Machine even more focused insight into itself?

Then there’s the darker side. First, they intend to -if not already- use your PC’s microphone to monitor ‘background audio’ ‘in order to listen to TV’s and so forth to garner better ads for the user’. As US intelligence agencies already monitor subjects via their cell phone microphones, which can only be prevented by removing the phones battery, you can expect Google equipped mobile devices and automobiles to do the same. Second, another goal is acquiring every persons DNA code, and then making it searchable online as another “Product”. This could prove to be their most challenging ambition, but in Google tradition they’ve rolled out the (on the surface) independent “23andMe” social networking personalized genome service which is already showing signs of targeting children for systematic indoctrination in DNA databanks.

Much of their epic archiving quest wont even immediately pay off, but it’s being kept as fruit waiting to ripen, or rather waiting for their conscious entity to ripen to be able to harness it. By this point many would declare that AGI isn’t possible, but regardless of beliefs and possibilities (external possibilities aren’t dependent on one persons beliefs), the stated goal exists.

Peter Norvig, former head of the now Intelligent Systems Division at NASA’s ARC, and now Google’s Director of Research, in 2007, claimed that Google is already co-evolving with the Internet. “We hadn’t expected that”, he said. But the Googler’s seem to be right on course to reach their ambitions by conscious direction of that delves beyond mere emergence alone. There are many cases of the 2 Google co-founders going on the record about “AI”, and between them and their related media’s, it’s quite clear that their intentions aren’t merely ‘narrow AI’ nor is any of it mere accident.

Take for instance machine vision. Begin with Google Video and shortly afterwards they acquired Youtube. These are both sites where the user does the work in providing the profitable content for them. For some it was neat for Youtube results to appear in Google Video searches, but then Google began crawling most of all other streaming video hosts including many of their competitors. During that shuffle, Google acquired Neven Vision, the worlds most advanced machine vision firm. One desirable prospect for Google was that NV’s technology was already geared for mobile devices. Another was that it was designed for both still photos and videos. It can be understood as advanced biometrics that’s designed to recognize all types of objects, not just human faces.

So while you’re walking around your neighborhood waving your GPS equipped Google mobile device around, it’s possible that Google is storing your cameras data in building Google’s omnipresent worlds eye. But I see a scarier side: When their infantile systems grow conscious enough, not only would they -or It- know and understand everything humanity has ever written, it would also have to a certain degree all of our videos from film to personal cams. One side is it helps it become sentient, the other is it accelerates its ability to understand humans individually and socially. After all, you couldn’t expect a machine to become conscious & intelligent without vision, nor could it understand humans without seeing them in action.

An intelligent thinking machine would also needs ears, and ears they are giving it. Make a call to 1-800-GOOG411 and experience their speech recognition algorithms for yourself. No surprise that the service is free, because the more people use it the more you help them reach their goal of omniscience. And it’s safe to assume to this technology is busy helping it listen to all of the videos it’s looking at. Meanwhile, their Translate efforts has their system rapidly learning how to translate any language from any language, guided by a handful of engineers who in most cases don’t even know the languages themselves. You can see this by doing the typical search, and you can bet they’re already working on integrating the technology into audio speech recognition.

Above we have the perfect outline of inherent rise of sentience via emergence, but they aren’t leaving it to just that. In May of 2008, Google hosted their own “Machine Learning Summit“, of which “most of the material covered (documents, videos, presentations) at these types of events is confidential and proprietary and can’t be released.” Prior to that, in 2006, internal documents leaked stating their plans the build “the worlds largest AI laboratory”. That lab might be already existent somewhere in their own properties, or it might be in or set to be in a government / military facility.

The facility could be in one of their many data-centers or other secretive locations. A ‘secretive‘ data-center of public fame is known best as “PROJECT02“, which has direct access to cheap power via a hydroelectric damn owned and operated by the US Army Corp of Engineers. Being the size of ‘2 football fields’, it sounds reminiscent of what everyone used to say in reference to the NSA’s Echelon system that was and is used to monitor virtually every form of telecommunications in the US and much of the Earth.

There’s no telling how many Google facilities exist, but is can be said that they wouldn’t need one centralized location for the ‘worlds largest AI lab’. With global telecommunications now being radically different than 60 years ago, private intranets can connect up any remote office or personal computer as a collective. This means that a modern day Manhattan Project could be operated across the planet in secret with great ease. This would especially be the case if you had literally a million or more parallel platformed CPU’s at your disposal (like Google does). Consider that computing power per $1000 is literally less than millionth what was during the Manhattan Project, and that project only cost about US$24 billion. Anything even resembling a modern semiconductor computer hadn’t even been invented yet. Meanwhile, every year their capabilities expand as CPU prices drop and work gets easier, exponentially, thanks to Moore’s Law and the Law of Accelerating Returns.

On the surface, Google seems to be poised to be able go it alone in their effort, yet they are in deep cahoots with the US military’s parallel initiative. Since the US military maintains global supremacy via its Navy, one could almost Google to roll out plans for ‘naval’ data-centers (which they have). The full scope of government & military involvement with Google’s AGI project goes well beyond the scope of this analysis, but suffice to say that Google have in 2008 signed a 40-90 year lease, with their geographical neighbors, at NASA’s Ames Research Center (ARC), in Silicon Vally, for a 1.2 million square feet collaborative research facility. But not only does Google get to build on the government land there, they already have exclusive access to land and park their private Google jumbo jets on ARC’s “Moffitt Field”.

ARC is historically NASA’s prime hub of AI & AGI research, so it’s of little surprise that Sergey Brin, when asked about the partnership, repeatedly mentioned “AI” as the primary strategic interest. Also relevant in this summary, is the fact that Google was initially funded by DARPA, NASA, ane the National Science Foundation. It’s also been alleged by a former CIA agent that not only did the CIA fund them during their earlier years, but that the CIA has an actual office in the main Googleplex headquarters, while it’s a fact that Google hardware runs the US Intelligence Community’s ‘spy wikipedia‘. DARPA claims the fame of inventing the Internet, and by visiting their website you can browse through their extensive list of various inter-related “cognitive” “self-aware” artificial intelligence projects. Vint Cerf, Google’s “Chief Internet Evangelist” VP, ‘invented the Internet’ together with Bob Kahn via DARPA. Vint still works with NASA on the “Interplanetary Internet”, as well as on other projects for the United States military.

Lastly, in terms of a so-called ‘god on earth’ status, Larry Page has stated the desires to get started on “climate modification”, a dream of military strategists since ancient times. Fostering such a sentiment with Google’s de-facto government-operation status via NASA & DARPA, humanity doesn’t just face whatever typically assumed degrees of ‘computer control’ by the omnipresent and omniscient Machine, the Machine is on the path of geophysical omnipotence. NASA, in recent years, has pursued the perfect program to mesh with this. The goal of the “Intelligent Archives” sounds familiar to everything Google is doing in terms of “understanding” massive amounts of data. They even used the phrases “self-aware” and “cognitive”. The projects webpage now speak in the past tense, and it’s unclear its true status after its parent division became the “Intelligent Systems Division”. In any case, with deep integration with NASA and their Earth sciences, and the military and their hundreds of top secret satellites, and AI all in-between, I’d say Page has found the perfect scenario to pursue this dream.

In closing, lets just say that Google manages to actually understand what the data in its own text data-holdings ‘means’. This could be kept simply between webpages and books. Consider hundreds of thousands of texts related to related to programming languages and software engineering (essentially everything on the subject). By using Google Search we can tell the system is very much in perpetual tune with its own complete data-holdings. One could argue that they’re flirting with “hard-takeoff” AGI emergence on this front alone. And if you spend enough time putting complex worded search strings ‘into’ Google Calculator and Code Search you might help make that a reality.

Imagine what it would mean if the Google co-founders get their wish of Google being directly connected to human minds via neural interface. That might make people reconsider that Google fought for the new wireless Internet spectrum, and are working to bring 3 billion new people the Internet, good things.

SEE ALSO:

*Mobile Google Android to condition people to embrace constant GPS tracking

*Google Founders Artificial Intelligence Quotes Archive

IIBFilms: DARPA’s iXo Artificial Intelligence Control Grid: ‘The Official Version’

*An Inconvenient Truth on Al Gore: Google & NASA A.I.